https://www.duolingo.com/nino_dominicano

Two languages at once?

Alright, so my dad and a lot of my family speak Spanish. When I was little he didn't teach me (shame on him). Now I'm 12 and learning Spanish. I've always been interested in Esperanto though. Now that Duolingo has finally released it to Beta, I thought I'd try it out. But now I love it. It has been so easy I think I like it better than Spanish. Tomorrow, I go to New York. My grandma lives there and she only speaks Spanish. I've been doing my Spanish pretty hardcore. But whenever I do something difficult, I think of how easy it would be if I was doing Esperanto. Then, I thought, Hey! I could try both! So, all of that to say, should I do them at the same time? If so, will it be confusing? Thanks in advance! :)

3 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ichdetello

Cool i have the same story as you do with Spanish.I do recommend building a Spanish core before learning a similar language given the fact that Esperanto was influenced by Spanish because you will start to confuse the languages so keep study Spanish for a few more months and once you start being able to have conversations in Spanish that's when you can start Esperanto but if you rely want to go for it now

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nino_dominicano

thx

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thraenthraen
thraenthraen
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It really varies from person to person, and even from time to time. I initially struggled with learning more than one language at a time as I kept switching up the vocabulary between languages, but I've been working on Esperanto, Ukrainian, and Norwegian this week and still keeping up with some Dutch. For me, it was a matter of first learning how to learn a language and focus on it (Dutch), and then once I got into a rhythm with that and developed a solid base in the language, it became much easier to start adding in other languages, even ones that are similar and therefore easier to mix up (like Dutch and Norwegian). If I was giving advice to past-me, I'd say pick one language—whichever you're most passionate about—and focus on it first. You can add in a second language once you've built a good language-learning habit.

You/your brain might be quiet different from me/my brain though, so do whatever works best for you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/._.Polyglot._.

I am doing 4 languages at once it is easy for me but it depends on the person.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChuckWalter

I'm no expert, but I have heard that a good way to keep languages seperate is to study each one in different areas. So if you have the mobile duolingo app use that for Spanish in one part of your house, and then use a device that works with Esperanto (like a PC) at a different area of the house. Always keep these areas the same, and the languages for each area the same. Then, when you speak Spanish try to think of your Spanish area, and with Esperanto think of your Esperanto area.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

That's what I did with Swedish (laptop) and Spanish (phone). It helped a LOT to keep things organized; I just ultimately decided that I wanted to focus my energy on Spanish.

Also, keep a notebook--preferably two, one for each language. Writing things down helps with memory in a way that typing or passively reading/listening does not. My Swedish notes included translations, pronunciation, useful info like plurality or gender (ett vs en) and sometimes a sentence in context.

OP, because Esperanto borrowed heavily from Spanish, you might find it helpful to somehow note (charts? venn diagrams?) the ways in which Esperanto is like Spanish, and the ways in which Esperanto is like English. I haven't studied Esperanto, so this may be completely off-base, but I've found that learning about the etymology of words can be really helpful in remembering their meanings.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReVelArmy

If you do 2 at the same time I would recommend doing them both on the same day so you will not forget previous lessons. That way, you will be more efficient. It really depends on your timing and your skills. Try doing 2 and if it is too confusing, try it later. My major problem was for getting vocabulary, so make sure your memory is sharp. Maybe you can speak to your abuelita and see if you can learn any new skills (and correct sentences).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jodough14

I tried learning Spanish and French at the same time and found myself getting words and grammar mixed up. I kind of put French on hold there and focused on Spanish, now I am learning Turkish (sorry for neglecting you, French).Mind you, I'm also doing university work on the side and so it may have had a lot to do with time constraints. It all depends on how well you think you can cope with it, I suppose. Best of luck!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

That's cool! I also have a grandma who only speaks Spanish and I learned it for my family. I'm learning 3 languages right now and actually I'm not getting confused. I agree with you though I think I like Esperanto better than Spanish too. Best of Luck in Learning! :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mangakoibito
mangakoibito
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Even if you are one of the people who find it difficult to keep them separate it's possible to work through it with effort! But just taking two weeks to power through as much Esperanto as you can stand may help with your ability to understand grammar! "Studies have been conducted in New Zealand,[50] United States,[51][52][53] Germany,[54] Italy[55] and Australia.[56] The results of these studies were favorable and demonstrated that studying Esperanto before another foreign language expedites the acquisition of the other, natural, language. This appears to be because learning subsequent foreign languages is easier than learning one's first foreign language, whereas the use of a grammatically simple and culturally flexible auxiliary language like Esperanto lessens the first-language learning hurdle. In one study,[57] a group of European secondary school students studied Esperanto for one year, then French for three years, and ended up with a significantly better command of French than a control group, who studied French for all four years. Similar results have been found for other combinations of native and second languages, as well as for arrangements in which the course of study was reduced to two years, of which six months is spent learning Esperanto.[56]"

3 years ago
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