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"He drinks the cup of coffee."

Translation:Ólann sé an cupán caife.

3 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/mpbell
mpbell
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Still struggling with genitive case; why is this wrong: "Ólann sé cupán an chaife"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That would mean “He drinks the cup of the coffee”.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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Not "he drinks a cup of the coffee"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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No — the structure X an/na Y, where X is a noun and Y is a genitive noun, also makes X definite.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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So is there no way to say "an X of the Y" in Irish? "A bird in the hand"? "An ace in the hole"? "A man of the people"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The dative needs to be used rather than the genitive for that structure — éan sa láimh (although the Irish version of the proverb uses éan i do dhorn [“a bird in your fist”]), ás sa pholl, fear den choitiantacht.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nina462140
Nina462140
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I would also like to know this

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/medieval-monk

Where is the "of" in this sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Caife in this sentence is genitive, so its translation is “of coffee”.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/medieval-monk

But isn't the regular form of coffee also "caife"...?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Yes, it is. Some nouns have identical forms for the nominative singular and the genitive singular.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Namely, those nouns whose plural form is a considered a 'strong' plural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/coreyhus
coreyhus
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And is there a visual way to identify a "strong plural"?

2 years ago