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  5. "Sønnen min elsker å vaske op…

"Sønnen min elsker å vaske opp."

Translation:My son loves to do the dishes.

June 1, 2015

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mcbruner

Said no parent ever. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mbukha

Why is "My son loves to clean up" not a correct answer?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iorua

"å vaske opp" means "to do the dishes" or "to wash up". "clean up" would be "rense opp", "rydde unna", "gjøre rent (i)". "vaske opp" has a very unambiguous meaning in Norwegian, and is not confused with other kinds of cleaning. "vaske" on its own, on the other hand, would be "wash" or "clean". I hope this made sense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cbsplinter

I said "my son loves to wash up," and believed that it meant to clean himself. I understand that the common meaning is to "do the dishes" but could it not mean that too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahAnn67

I think in American English, "to wash up" means "to wash yourself". In British English, it always means doing the dishes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PumpedUpKickz

I'm a Brit and you are absolutely right. "Washing up" in the UK means to wash/clean the dishes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheSolamnic

It could mean either in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LukaAlien

I believed ''wash up'' to be washing himself too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vidaconvivial

Might that include a "seg" in there somewhere? Idk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TARDISToni

Er sønnen din singel? :-D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarackObam797426

Bra, sønnen din er rar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHarr347673

In britian some people, i.e. me, use the term wash up or washing up to mean cleaning dishes (usually more in the sink than a dish washer) and "scrub up" when talking about cleaning ourselves.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geoffrey_Carlton

So "wash up" is an idiom for "wash the dishes" in Norway?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJB2002

You've never heard of "washing up" before?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ayumistudies

This comment is 6 months old already but since you never got an answer I figured I'd chime in haha. I'm American and for me, "washing up" makes me think of washing myself up, usually my face or hands. I'm specifically from New York, so I'm not sure if other parts of the country use "washing up" to refer to dishes or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveClyde

Is the å here necessary before vaske?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WendigoAK

Yes. Å comes from the infinite form of the verb, which is used with non-auxiliary verbs (such as 'elsker' - to love). It's like in English: He loves TO do the dishes. You may not use å with auxiliary verbs though: vil, må, skal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Philingo

Send him round to my house.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoltanDamo

I see what you did there


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dewingtons

Examples like this always get my Norwegian partner angry - she says that elsker just isn't ever used apart from when the "love is a deep, truly meaningful passionate affection, the kind reserved for married couples and Romeo and Juliet!" And that this particular example would mean that the son in question has some deeply troubling feelings towards dishes!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaE007

So how would she say it? Strange concept as it is!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard411909

In the UK "Wash up" is more acceptable than "do the dishes"

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