1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Non lo dico neanch'io."

"Non lo dico neanch'io."

Translation:I do not say it either.

September 30, 2013

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marciamckean1

This is extremely awkward English; the literal translation does not work. Here the conditional is implied, and the translation is "I wouldn't say it either." This kind of thing is subtle but important, as it distinguishes someone who knows English from someone who is translating it literally. AND the "lo" here refers to the thing said rather than the person it is said to, the d.o. rather than the i.o. as commented previously in this discussion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marciamckean1

I see now that you could say "I don't say it either" depending on the context, but still the conditional would usually make more sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marciamckean1

I'm correcting myself again: Couldn't neanch'io be translated as "Not even I?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

In answer to marciamckean1: I also wrote "don't" and was marked wrong. DL corrected it to "do not". Yet in previous lessons "don't" and "do not" were equally accepted. Is there a glitch in the program? So I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsir

Could it be translated "I don't tell him either"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crumplehorn

I think that would be 'Non gli dico neanch'io'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsir

Thanks, you are probably right, "gli" as "him" kills me every time :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeffrey.eggers

Isn't "lo" the direct object form and "gli" the indirect object form for both "him" and "it(m)"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

I agree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benczurp

Is my feeling right that this Italian sentence has a different emphasis -- in English, something like "Neither I say that"? Not exactly the same as "I do not say it either". In the second, the (n)either refers to "say it", while in the first, it emphasises "neither I".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marciamckean1

In English you would never say "either I" or "neither I," that is, neither would come before the subject. Very different from Italian. But when you say "neanch'io" could it mean "not even I?" as in "Not even I would say that? I do think either way that the conditional is implied in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benczurp

"Neither you Simon, nor the fifty thousand Nor the Romans, nor the Jews Nor Judas, nor the twelve Nor the priests, nor the scribes Nor doomed Jerusalem itself Understand what power is Understand what glory is Understand at all Understand at all" http://www.lyricsdepot.com/jesus-christ-superstar/simon-zealote-poor-jerusalem.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/benczurp

But I agree that "not even I say that" sounds better, though the meaning is slightly different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tiago_R_Mendes

I had that impression too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maryntltz82

I don't say it as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vcrescenzi

Yet again they are even rigid with alternati e proper english translations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoToutin

is neanche io soooooooooooo bad ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/efdfirefighter20

No since that particular spelling (neanch'io) was NOT taught in any of the lessons and should not be used during refresher lessons. The Duolingo Italian seems notorious for this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Queens1963

I do not even say it. This was marked wrong. Can someone explain why? Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorge_bogbos

Glad to know that I am not the only one who thinks the suggested translation is terribly awkward english. Nobody speaks like that! How come "I don't even say it" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobinMA

If someone tells you they never use a particular swear word, you might say this. Or not. ;-)

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.