"la dek-kvina de decembro, mil okcent kvindek naŭ"

Translation:December fifteenth, eighteen fifty-nine

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Albrechtion
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 20
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 8
  • 4
  • 4

That's Dr. Zamenhof's birthday!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RomajiAmulo

Ah, I was wondering the signifigance

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VincentOostelbos
  • 22
  • 21
  • 16
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Ooh, that was also the year of Charles Darwin's "On the Origin of Species"! But that was November 24th :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scorpyn

Am I the only one who is completely unable to hear the k in dek? :(

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calibrandon85

I think the translation is terrible. Nobody writes a date like that.... It should be written December 15, 1859

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/C.Sheppard
  • 23
  • 14
  • 7
  • 47

Most people do. That's actually an American thing to write it MM/DD/YYYY; most places do DD/MM/YYYY because it grows in significance

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeraldFitzjerald

La naskiĝtago de Doktoro Esperanto!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noeladoe

Why not "dek ok kvindek naŭ" or something alike?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lyubomirv
  • 18
  • 15
  • 14
  • 14
  • 3

I don't think that's an acceptable way of saying an year in Esperanto. You have to say it like a number.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvindy
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 23
  • 11
  • 1081

Saying years like that is a quirk of English. Just about every other language treats years as single numbers. (e.g. 1999 would be said as "one thousand nine hundred ninety-nine" in every language except for English.) Since the English way is more complicated to learn and extremely rare, Esperanto doesn't use it.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ben.ohannesian

Was that not accepted? I don't know why… Perhaps numbers are only said one way in Esperanto. Everything else tends to be quite standardised for of learning, so it wouldn't surprise me.

I think, technically, saying "eighteen fifty nine" or "eighteen hundred (and) fifty nine" could be considered slang of a kind, or just lazy, whereas "one thousand eight hundred and fifty nine" would be proper.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boi366783

Happy birthday!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacobBurre

Isn't "mil okcent" translated to: "one thousand eight hundred"?

How is this translated to "eighteen" then?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeraldFitzjerald

Duo is translating the way of saying a year in Esperanto to the way of saying a year in English rather than directly translating it as "one thousand eight hundred fifty-nine"

I don't really like it either, but if they hadn't done it I don't think I would've realized it was a date

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wogus1234
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 2

1859.12.15

7 months ago
Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.