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  5. "Bonan tagon kaj bonvenon!"

"Bonan tagon kaj bonvenon!"

Translation:Good day and welcome!

June 1, 2015

26 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jxetkubo

You use "bonan matenon" in the morning, "bonan tagon" in the afternoon, "bonan vesperon" in the evening and the early night. "Saluton" can be used at any time.

When you part, you say "ĝis revido" or short "ĝis", at night also "bonan nokton."

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoMoita_PT

Thanks. But... "Bonan tagon" in the afternoon? So what about "Bonan posttagmezon"?

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jxetkubo

That would be an anglicism. :-)

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kbalara

Unfortunately there are new anglicisms into esperanto every day. :(

July 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bnohlimabr

What do you mean?

January 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TiagoMoita_PT

I know the basics of a few different languages, and I get the sense that you either say in those languages "Good morning", or "Good day" when you are greeting someone, which seems to be the case: "Bonan tagon KAJ BONVENON".

Now when it comes to English, as far as I know, you can say "good day", but at least nowadays, not as a form of saying hello, but rather when parting, especially if you're annoyed, and you're saying it sarcastically.

So what's the rule here? You say "Bonan matenon" in the morning, or you can also say "Bonan tagon" instead, and use it throughout the whole day in general, until sunset? Is that it?

June 1, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/0zikoo

Bonan tagon = hello (all day). It's like bonjour (French) or Guten Tag (German). Bonan matenon = good morning.

May 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaPirocque

What do the -n means in these cases where there is no verb, but only an restrictly nominal sintagma?

July 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jimnice

The sense of the phrase is 'have a good day' ard here the verb 'havu' is implied. Nouns following 'havi' take the accusitive.

September 17, 2015

[deactivated user]

    "Have a good day" in US English, or "I wish you a good day" in British English. But "havu" and "deziras" take the accusitive.

    April 15, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DW9988

    LaPirocque: In this instance, bonan tagon is the shortened version of the sentence I wish you a good day -- good day is an object, so it needs the two -n. This is covered in one of the "Tips and notes" sections. (I've been told that one can see them when using a laptop or desktop but not when using a mobile device.)

    December 15, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/victory_ave

    Buntag means day in Cebuano.

    October 25, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgoriasilva

    Why "Bona tago kaj bonvenon" is not accepted? "Bona = good", "tago = day", what's that -n doing there?

    January 27, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreanThom

    This phrase is short for "Have a good day and welcome" so day, and by extension good, are accusatives.

    May 16, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aora18

    Sorry, I dont see it. Where do you see it

    December 31, 2018

    [deactivated user]

      What is it that you don't see? The matter mentioned by GreanThom about "Good day and welcome" being short for "Have a good day and welcome", perhaps? The fact remains that such greetings as "Good Day", "Goodnight", "Happy Christmas" and "Happy New Year" are all contractions, with "Have a..." or perhaps "I wish you a...." missed out. That is why all such greetings take the accusative -n in Esperanto. Of course the same words can be used in sentences where they are not a greeting, and in such cases the accusative may not be needed. For instance, "It's a good day for the competition" would be "Estas bona tago por la konkurso", but greetings, and expressions like "Bonan apetiton" (literally, "Good appetite", or as we would say in English, "Enjoy your meal") always take the accusative.

      January 1, 2019

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chayevarka

      "Bonan vesperon el Ukraine!" Did I do good?

      March 31, 2019

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fiyalka2

      Remember that nouns end on -o in Esperanto (like in Usono), so it would be "Bonan vesperon el Ukrainio" - or "Ukrainujo", Wikipedia uses both. :o)

      September 18, 2019

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MosesPeris

      Bonan tagon can be Good day and Good afternoon

      September 28, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Huy_Ngo

      Bon Tag! Guten journée!

      XD

      October 7, 2017

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kelikaku

      The volume level of this sentence was 1¾ louder than the previous one. Is there some way that, for those of us with headsets, the volume of these exercises could be made more safe for the ears of the people trying to learn Esperanto? Thanks in advance. בס"ד

      May 29, 2019

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KxngDeo.

      Is 'bonan' only used for days? Like goodnight and good afternoon.

      September 17, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GreanThom

      No, bona means good in all senses. It takes on the "-n" ending here, because the sentence is short for "Have a good day" so day and good are in the accusative.

      May 25, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bllrdyldz

      Doesn't "Bonan tagon" mean "Have a good time"? It refuses "Have a good day." It's weird.

      April 25, 2017

      [deactivated user]

        It's actually short for something like, "Mi deziras al vi bonan tagon" . ("I wish you a good day"). The English expression, "Have a good time" is another way of saying, "Enjoy yourself!" which in Esperanto would be: "Amuziĝu!"

        April 26, 2017

        https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bllrdyldz

        Thank you very much your clear explanition. I got it.

        April 26, 2017
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