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"Tá an madra i dtrioblóid."

Translation:The dog is in trouble.

3 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/science_ed
science_ed
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The dog did it I swear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daragh823889

Love the comment dude SWAG!!!!!!!!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SadDuoBird
SadDuoBird
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madra dána!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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The dog is, well, in its house.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christiand428

I thought you shouldn't eclipse words that started with 't' or 'd'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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d, t are (except in Munster) not eclipsed after a preposition + article! e.g.:ar an teach = on the house

(see also tips and notes)

http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/eklipse.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asmartshell

"after the preposition i  if without article  e.g. i dteach = in a house  (similarly also after the archaic prepositions go = with, iar = to )"

http://nualeargais.ie/gnag/eklipse.htm

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grace419433

Everyones in trouble! Party in detention!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vanoosamaroo

Can someone help me understand the sentence structure for this example? Why do I desperately want to place "an madra" at the end of the sentence when forming this in my head? I'm guessing it has something to do with the "in" trouble part rather than the dog having trouble or trouble at the dog (ag/ar).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

So, is the verb. It comes first. Here, an madra is the subject, meaning it will follow the verb. the i dtrioblóid is the rest of the sentence, so comes after that. So, yes, it has to do with the i as opposed to trouble being 'at' or 'on' the dog, in which case it'd be Tá trioblóid ar an madra.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VirtueHerrell

What did the dog do now?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo
ZuMako8_Momo
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Is the word "trioblóid" a singular or plural noun? My guess is that it is plural because of the "i" before the "d" (just like "capaill" is plural for "capall"), but I could be wrong XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ballygawley
Ballygawley
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No need to gess online,

http://www.teanglann.ie/en/gram/triobl%c3%b3id

trioblóidí

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Soph609900

Help him!

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LenaCapaillUisce

Someone help him

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chante01

So a direct translation for the sentence "is the dog in trouble." It sounds like a question but if it isn't how would i know if it was a question?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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It’s not a question because the verb precedes the subject in Irish. As Cobblesmith noted, a question in Irish would begin with the interrogative particle an (which is not the same word as the article an) before the verb.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cobbleduff

Duolingo, for some reason, failed to post my reply and I've lost it so I'll try again with a shorter response. "Tá" is how you express the present tense of "to be" in Irish. "Tá mé" means "I am", not "is me", so direct word-for-word translations can be misleading or unhelpful sometimes. If this were a question, it'd be "an bhfuil an madra i dtrioblóid?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crepitaculum

Is é an madra gcónaí i dtrioblóid ...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul5595

Obviously a typo

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffFoster14
JeffFoster14
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Tá an locht na gcat.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LenaCapaillUisce

Does this mean the dog is in trouble i.e. needs help (like he is stuck somewhere or in danger), or does it mean he's in trouble i.e. getting yelled at for being naughty?

4 months ago