"Det smaker."

Translation:It tastes good.

June 1, 2015

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deyan161

The real English translation of this is 'mmmmmm mmmmm mmmmmmm" with lots of intonation thrown in.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luke_5.1991

Someone's been watching Food Network.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jacobhilton

Kan jeg si "Det smaker bra." eller nei?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alek_d

Yes, and it is accepted now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilithGNM

If 'smaker' by itself means tastes good, does the sentence "Det smaker av kylling" imply "It tastes like chicken (and I like it)," or does it lose that implication?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cbsplinter

My intuition tells me that it's like English. We say "That smells!" and then we say "that smells like chicken," and the connotation is lost.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LilithGNM

That makes sense! I hadn't thought of that. Tusen takk!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KubaFrankowski

Oh cool it's the same as the Polish "smak" (noun for taste) and "smakować" (to taste good).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

And the same as the german "schmeckt". "Das schmeckt" is just the same as "it tastes good".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/grauer_Pilger

In German we also use the slang-word "Schmackofatz" if something is really tasty. That word has no meaning in itself, but I dare to see a connection to "Geschmack", "smaker" "schmecken" etc. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gary_Kotka

"It is tasty." accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/katawalker

In fact norwegians would never say that, would they? They would always say: Det smakte (eller var) godt, ikke sant? They always talk about taste in past tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Filthy lies and slander.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

Aha! But not a denial!! Bueno pues, es la verdad. 13Jun17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/badkelly

"It tastes" is accepted, but it says the translation is, "It tastes good". Should 'godt' be added at the end?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

Linn: If it does NOT taste good, would you negate using ikke? Maybe use daarlig? 13Jun17


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

A straight-up negation of this sentence ("Det smaker ikke") would not work, though you could use "Det smaker meg ikke" with the implication of "It doesn't taste good to me".

Other options:

"Det smaker ikke (så) godt." (this is less insulting than the below, if you're commenting on someone's cooking.)

"Det smaker vondt (/dårlig/fælt...)."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mngamers

How can it be implied ...what if you wanted to say it said tasted bad?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

I think "det smaker ikke" or "det smaker dårlig" or "det smaker ikke godt" should work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilHevican

"Tastes Good" Not accepted..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BeornScead

So you can say 'it tastes good' but not 'this tastes good'? In which instance would you be tasting something but unable to specify 'this'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SnowDragon07

I believe "this tastes good" would be "dette smaker".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/T.Granger

It sounds like an unfinished sentence...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beerzoe

No, just a fixed expression. The 'good' is implied.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sw1tchw1tch

Does the extra k in 'snakker' vs 'smaker' imply a difference in pronunciation that I'm not hearing? Or is it kind of arbitrary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan_D_13

If I am not mistaken, the "a" in "smaker" is pronounced longer than the one in "snakker".

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