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  5. "Ni babilu!"

"Ni babilu!"

Translation:Let us chat!

June 2, 2015

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiddo-depido

ohhhhh I remember the old times in lernu.net

"La tujmesagxilo" and "La babilejo" <3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/everton.flavio

Why "old times"? "Tujmesaĝilo" still works..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anu1217

I remember what "babilu" means by thinking of "babble."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaizinM

Yup, that word is indeed etymologically related to babili. It's an old word that appears in most (or all?) Germanic languages, including English (babble), German (babbeln), Dutch (babbelen), Swedish (babbla), etc, etc.

But as the i in the middle gives away, the Esperanto word specifically comes from the French word babiller, which in turn likely entered the French language through a dialect of Old Dutch, during or before the middle ages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rippler

If you want to trace it back further, it would be reasonable to say that the word's origin is the Tower of Babel from the Bible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lumoso

Which is a tower in the place בבל (Bavel). The root בלבל (balbel) means to confuse. Which I always thought was related, but it's a different root, so now I'm not sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claire_resurgent

I believe it's often explained as a very old-school pun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Notasurgeon

What about "We should chat?" I learned elsewhere that a 'u' verb after a pronoun like mi, ni, etc. implied "should." So that's how I interpreted this Esperanto sentence. It doesn't seem that far off from their translation, either. Thoughts?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kreilyn

"-u" is used to form the imperative!

"We should chat" would be Ni devus babili!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephieRice

-u is technically used to form the jussive which serves as the imperative and the subjunctive


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CsabaSndor

In real life I use the world: "Ni babilindus" - ind is standing for "it's worth to" eg. vidinda -something worth to see.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nunes89

Babili. Cute :3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rippler

Unfortunately, we cannot say the same for the cat-lips emoticon in Duolingo text :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keirwilliams

Is this telling someone to let them chat or are they saying let's chat?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CsabaSndor

Yeah, you are right. "Let us chat" means "Lasu nin babili", "Let's chat" means "Ni babilu" - Duolingo allows an incorrect translation here...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rapn21

Can you rephrase your question?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keirwilliams

Question is moot now


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ActualGoat

I think it's more like Let's chat in a casual way. This was over three weeks ago now, so you probably know, but I hope that hels :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cavman144

to me, "babilu" sounds like "babble".

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