"Tiu ĉi rado funkcias bone."

Translation:This wheel works well.

3 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JoeJScott
JoeJScott
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Rado, like radius - I like it ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elechim
elechim
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Now I know why my German bike is a Radon!! :)))

Rad (de) = rado (eo) = wheel (en)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidBock9
DavidBock9
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Auf Deutsch : Fahrrad - bicycle ; Motorrad - motorcycle.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottBoggs3

Maybe the people who named it spoke esperanto. Mi havas duradon.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spiffwalker
spiffwalker
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Why does ĉi come after tiu here? I thought ĉi tiu was a set phrase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Not set, you may place them in whichever order best suits you.

Ĉi tiu estas por la bonaĵo de tiuj ĉi homoj.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salvesen

Is one way more common or preferred than the other? Ĉi tie aŭ tie ĉi

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Totally interchangeable with no difference in meaning or emphasis.

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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From what I understand, ĉi tiu and tiu ĉi both mean "this". (Ditto for ĉi tie and tie ĉi both meaning "here".)

If there's any distinction at all, it's very subtle.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChuckBaggett

I wonder if anyone else confidently put "This radio works well". I think I even made it show me the meaning of rado but I didn't read it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cassincork

Me too!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

It couldn't be "good"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csi
csi
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You mean like "this wheel works good"? No, that's poor grammar. :( "Good" is and adjective, not an adverb. Google "good vs well" for more info on that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissThorson

I realize that now. Thank you. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeoName
GeoName
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You've never heard of flat adverbs? There are a lot of instances where the adjective form sounds natural, along with the adverb form.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BGXCB

In living English I wouldn't use either, I would simply say this wheel works. Working, as it is designed to do, means working well. Good and well both sound equally awkward to my ear.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Salvesen

It is very different to have things work or to have them work well

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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How do you say radio then?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phle70

I'm a bit unsure of what you mean, but here are a bunch of words:
(I hope at least one of them answers your question)

Esperanto rado ( ← no i !) = English wheel
the cart below has 2 wheels

Esperanto radiofonio (radiofoni'o), radio (radi'o) = English radio, radio receiver

Esperanto radiuso (radius'o) = English radius
("r" in the picture below)

Esperanto rilatumo (rilat'um'o) = English ratio
example: the ratio 4:3

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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Thanks I meant the second but this proved to be a very useful study of Esperanto words :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phle70

Nedankinde! :-)

Generally, I'd also recommend getting an account over at Lernu! (lernu.net) (if you haven't got one already).
Even if you, like me, "don't really do any of their courses", they have a rather nifty multi-language (i.e. not just Esperanto-English-Esperanto!) dictionary function (available on their "front page"),
and you also (using the same account) get access to the Esperanto-Esperanto "Plena Ilustrita Vortaro de Esperanto" (even if a lot of the Esperanto used is "over my level", I can get a rather good grasp on how a word is built up / what parts there are in a word).

Both Wiktionary and Wikipedia are good, too, but they are user edited - i.e. content may be missing, or not 100 % correct (or or outdated, or even plain wrong).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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Wow thank you so much for all your tips, I'm going to look a t them right now! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mprdo
mprdo
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A great site; thanks for link. 21Jun18

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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You forgot one; Esperanto radio (radi'o) = English ray (as of light, etc.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamiLand

Why are tiu cxi together? Is it so long as there is a cxi, tiu won't mean "that" and instead will become "this"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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You seem to have answered your own question.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamiLand

Well I just wanted to make sure, so now my question is, why does it go together? Because "ĉi rado" would had meant the same thing right? So when does ĉi and tiu have to go together?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Okay, ĉi is used to say "This specific instance of …" and is usually associated with the T correlatives, such as tiu and tie to change "that thing, place, ktp" into "this thing, place, ktp." If one wishes to apply it to a noun then one can, and in fact probably should, include the appropriate correlative. Thus, we can have tiu rado to indicate a tire at some distance from ourselves, and ĉi tiu rado to indicate the tire currently being held up for inspection.

People do, on occasion, leave off the correlative; it's generally understood, but considered sloppy and bad form. It might even be considered childish speak, and it's certainly not what the Owl wants you to learn. In fact, in writing fiction, one might use that form to indicate that character x, over here, is severely undereducated or immature.

Nun, iru kaj faru tiun ĉi ĝuste!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DreamiLand

In that case, I'll always make sure to correlate cxiu for the sake of Duo D: Really appreciate the time you took to write out the whole explanation thought.

Vi estas granda helpo por mi, dankon!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whonx
whonx
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Why is it pronounced like a question? I almost made a mistake there...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeJScott
JoeJScott
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Don't mistake ĉu with ĉi - the former turns a statement into a yes/no question, the latter modifies that (tio/tiu) into this (tio ĉi/tiu ĉi) and there (tie) into here (tie ĉi). A question form of this sentence would be "Ĉu tiu ĉi rado funkcias bone?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whonx
whonx
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Thanks for the explanation :)

However, my source of confusion in that sentence is just the intonation of the audio, which sounds like a question but it's just an affirmation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hellomidnight

It doesn't sound like a question to me. I think it might be because of the way the stress falls on the second-to-last syllable of each word? In this particular sentence it happens to mimic the intonation we use for questions in English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/whonx
whonx
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Actually, I read somewhere (most likely wikipedia) that this final rise in the intonation occurs in "yes/no" (Ĉu) questions in most languages, not just English. Other kinds of questions, like those with "Wh-" are a whole another story.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csi
csi
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I've listened to the audio several times and there is no final rise in this sentence. The intonation starts high but falls at the final "bone". Try listening again. (Unless they've changed the audio since this was originally posted.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rippler
Rippler
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Try saying the English ten times fast. It's a tongue twister, man.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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"This wheel's on fire"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marethyu9

just like SOOOO many others in the exercises on here, im never gonna use this sentence.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
salivanto
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Yes, I think one of the weaknesses of Duolingo (the whole site - not specifically the Esperanto course) is that there's no focus on practical language. I'll say, though, that if you speak Esperanto for any amount of time, you will surely use all the words and grammar in this sentence - multiple times.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomas.Huntley

So is the infinitive form "funkcii"? How is the ending pronounced?

2 months ago
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