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"Har han brød?"

Translation:Does he have bread?

3 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EinsamWulf

Wouldn't "He has bread?" also be a correct translations of this?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TemShopper

If so, then the sentence would be "Han har brød". Since "har" came before the "han", and "har" can translate to "does have" (in this case "does...have"), it would be "Does he have bread?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vtopphol
vtopphol
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That would sound more like a way of expressing surprise over the fact that he has bread. You could do that in Norwegian, but then it would be "Han har brød?".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LORFEDOROVIC

Thanks for asking this, I was wondering too!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProPlayFin

I think same

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lukutar
Lukutar
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Can anyone correct me if i'm wrong, but when the whole sentence is spoken I hear Droe instead of B at the beginning of bread. Is that right or do I mishear things?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Artemisius

I have the same issue, mainly with the slower audio.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LORFEDOROVIC

I've had that same issue with the slower pronunciations on a few so far.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcia.kyle

She is speaking with a different dialect than the first two lessons, making it very hard to understand. That is part of the "problem" with learning Norwegian. There are many dialects spoken.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NatHofmann

Jesus,they love bread

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dylan11b

Ironically they eat it for breakfast alot of times... Interesting people

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KlaudiafromSVK

even Slovaks :D

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JarrelWhit

im lost on how the translation is. im not saying its wrong. i just want the translation explained better to me for a better understanding.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/quis_lib_duo
quis_lib_duo
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Norwegian, unlike English, does not use (to) do for questions, hence does have translates to har.

A question has an inverse word order compared to a declaration, hence: Har han brød? (= Has he bread?)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JarrelWhit

ok that makes alot more sense to me now. thanks alot :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mybum

can someone explain how to pronounce 'brød' please, because it sounds different every time!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Orcaguy
Orcaguy
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The first thing to notice with this word is that the d at the end is not pronounced. The b is the same, but the r is pronounced like the tt in "butter" or "bottle". The ø is pronounced sort of like "uh", except your lips are protruded like a kiss. The ø is also long since there is no (apparent pronounced) consonant after it.

I can tell you're no longer active, but I hope this reaches someone else. In IPA, it is written /brøː/, or more precisely [bɾøʷː]

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelSaphir

Jeg har brød med smør!

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HeathRitch

Yeah its tricky. Has he bread? I used "Does he have bread?" All good

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lotti881109

You never say " he have " You say, he has

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elcio_Jr
Elcio_Jr
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Pronunciation doubt here. "Har han", to me it sounds like the H in "han" disappears because of the final R from the previous word. Does H becomes silent after R?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vtopphol
vtopphol
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That's very common, yes. Especially when the syllable starting with an H is light. If the syllable starting with an H is heavy, however, the R would become very light, or disappear. Also, the N at the end of 'han' would be assimilated to the following consonant, so the pronunciation would be "Harambrø?".

7 months ago