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"Kan det regne katter og hunder?"

Translation:Can it rain cats and dogs?

June 2, 2015

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/babbeloergosum

But this doesn't exist as an expression in Norwegian, does it? Is there an equivalent? For example in German we say "es regnet Bindfäden" (it's raining cords) or "es regnet wie aus Eimern" (it's raining like from buckets).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig

This is not an expression in Norwegian. An equivalent would be "Det regner kattunger" (It's raining kittens)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/babbeloergosum

Takk for svaret :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stigjohan

Heavy rain is described by expressions like "det bøtter ned", "det høljer ned" and "det styrtregner"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

Stigjohan, I say "det høljer" and I am from Oslo, my husband says: "det bøtter ned" and he is from Tromsø.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valvakia

Haha, so we both have the same expression :) In French we can say "Il pleut des cordes" ! (yet we have another expression "Il pleut comme vache qui pisse" - "it's raining like a pissing cow". So bucolic. :D)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aanaaaa

If you want to know about portuguese, we say " está chovendo canivetes" = it is raining penknives


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thomas794602

In Holland we say 'het regent pijpenstelen', which means something like " it's raining pipe stalks " :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard

Precies! (Usually translated "pipe stems.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirstm

No one says "está chovendo canivetes" in Brazilian portuguese, at least not in southeast.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aanaaaa

For sure we say, at least in São Paulo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kirstm

Funny, I've never seen anyone saying it. You live in the county or the metropolis itself?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aanaaaa

The capital :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

In Esperanto it's simply "pluvegas" (it's raining very heavily), but that language is not big on metaphorical hyperbole.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.J.26

In Portuguese we'd say : Tá chovendo canivete (It's raining pocket knives)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jhmelman

Also "chovendo em bicas" (raining as [coming from a] faucet|fountain) and (maybe more old-fashioned) "chovendo a cântaros" (cântaro is Portuguese for some kind of ancient - greek? - pottery used to hold liquids, same idea)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Louise_the_Lotus

I especially love the comments under this sentence. Germans, Frenchmen, Norwegians, and Portuguese all sharing aspects of their culture through expressions of heavy rain. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricGjovaag

If it does, just be sure not to step in a poodle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mihail_Moldova

in Russian (льёт как из ведра) and Romanian (plouă cu găleata) it means "the rain is coming down with buckets"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna808760

We might also say that in the UK - it's coming down in buckets or it's bucketing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

Yes, I'd say "It's bucketing down" (as it is right now!).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna808760

Haha, it's eased off here atm


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna808760

Oooo, it's raining men! Someone should make a song about that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

I think that you are perhaps a bit late :p


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna808760

It was supposed to be a joke


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Sorry, I'll let myself out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LINHARS

I understood, I like that song.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Balazs087

My first try: "Can dogs and cats count?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vejuose

I'm not sure if posting external links is alright so I'll just let you know that Omniglot has an interesting collection of idioms for heavy rain in many different languages. It seems that it's raining chair legs in Greece, it kills the mice in Serbia... and tractors are falling in Slovakia? I wonder if anyone could confirm if this is true?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vejuose

Oh, I forgot to mention that it suggests a Norwegian expression "det regner trollkjerringer" (it's raining female trolls).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ramaskrik

I am a native Slovak and have never heard of the tractors idiom until now. I got surprised when I googled it and seen it being used. It must be used extremely rarely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabicenka

Definitely not slovak. I guess someone confused it with a Czech idiom (padaji trakare)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/A.Mladenovic69

Wet as a mouse, (mokar kao miš) Poor as a mouse from church (Siromašan kao crkveni miš)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KuunValossa

Funny, the second one also exists in German :) (arm wie eine Kirchenmaus)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

In English we have "Wet as a drowned rat" and "poor as a church mouse"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weerwater

You just have to love the Australian: It's a frog strangler!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joanne236389

It's true in Greece! "Βρέχει καρεκλοπόδαρα"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andl15

In Czech(ia) (and Slovakia also I'm pretty sure) it's not tractors [cz: traktor] but wheelbarrow [cz: trakař]. It not just sounds very similar in czech, but also has similar purpose in agriculture. One is modern and one oldfashioned vehicle (but still used in the coutryside). Nevertheless, both are pretty painful when raining and hitting people's faces :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rosomak4

In Polish it's raining frogs ;) I've also heard 'it's throwing frogs'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KALEDFWLCH

Only in southern Poland :) I've never heard this expression before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacekWilka

Agree with Rosomak4. I'm from southern Poland (Upper Silesia). There are common expressions here describing a heavy rain: "wali żabami" (it's throwing with frogs), or "żaby lecą z nieba" (there are frogs falling down from the sky)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenNieuw

Well, now we're at it, let's also translate to dutch:

"Het regent pijpenstelen" (It's raining pipe stems/pipe handles (from a smoking pipe, that is;))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/weerwater

Maar dan komt het ook met bakken uit de lucht en staan de hemelpoorten open!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NOR_WAY

In Italy we usually say: "Sta piovendo a dirotto" Witch doesn't have a real translation in english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carina829392

In Chinese, we describe a heavy rainfall as a "傾盆大雨" - like it's pooring from buckets :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ara198204

In English: "It's bucketing down"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

I've heard that one on occasion, but the "pouring (or raining) buckets" is also common around here. (Colorado)
There's also the term "Gully Washer."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard

"pouring buckets"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manuel_LH

In Spanish it would be: "Llueve a cántaros"(It's raining like from pitchers).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1130138903

In spanish we say about the same. Llueve perros y gatos "it is raining dogs and cats" or llueve a raudales "heavy raining"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scar53433

I'm spanish and never heard of this phrase. What i've heard a lot is: "llueve a cántaros", which fits the bucket-style rain from above


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pocholomarico

Me neither. I think we dont usually use these kind of expressions because in Spain the rain is mostly an exception not a rule


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Except in the plain?

Sorry, I'll find my own way out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Umukhanov

in azeri we say: "tut ucundan, çıx göyə" which literally means "catch the tip and climb up"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raviex

Probably not but we've seen FROGS fall from the sky more than once so... What do I know..?

:V


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Druulian

Is there a language where 'raining men' is used in a similar way


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

Will you accept frogs?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minnie182084

Nei. Det regner mennen!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Whalesintheattic

It's "Лье як з вядра" in Belarusian which is borrowed from Russian, and the Russian was already metioned above. I love how Duolingo educates one more than just teaching a language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Adrienne2993

In Welsh we say 'bwrw hen wragedd a ffyn' which means raining old ladies and sticks. Love seeing what idioms different languages use :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaveV17

And also it can rain men.

But seriously, raining animals actually is a thing:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rain_of_animals


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eddie_Werewolf

It's raining men! That's a song in America.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

Not just in America...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SokratisMp

Det samme finnes på språken min.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EJPol

In Dutch we say: 'het is hondenweer' (it is weather for dogs ;-))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

I thought "cats and dogs" was pretty much a UK exclusive expression.. but maybe including Australia and New Zealand. We also talk of rain coming down "like stair rods," but stair rods are devices not now much used... so that term may be increasingly obscure, even to us Brits!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredCapp

We also use the term in the US. It still doesn't make any logical sense to me, even though I know what it means and have used it. We also say "it's raining buckets" or refer to "gulley washers" (both terms of which I can make more sense of).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThisIsOwls

As people go, we just cant seem to say that its raining mire than usual. Another way of outting it in Britain which is more widely used than 'raining cats and dogs' is simply 'its pi**ing it down'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThisIsOwls

Sorry for the spelling mistakes. It won't let me edit it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaxThePilot

I wonder... how would you say "Can it calculate cats and dogs?" pa norsk?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusannaG1

Technically speaking: No, it cannot rain cats and dogs. Otherwise, yes.

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