"Ikbensterkdoordatikzwem."

Translation:I am strong because I swim.

3 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Lewons7
Lewons7
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door=through, dat=that. So throughthat. So to remember it it is like 'through doing that'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/profegringo
profegringo
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After years of studying romance languages, it is beautiful and refreshing to study a language that is so much closer to English!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IgorPetruk2

Also maybe "due that"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Also (and this reminds me of Spanish),

door=by=por

dat=that=que

Thus,

doordat=porque.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jay990827

Can you explain all the different ways of saying 'because' and in what context they should be used?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/R.L.S.
R.L.S.
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"Want" and "omdat" are interchangeable; they hold the same meaning. "Doordat" also means "since," which I believe is the difference. But I'm not a native speaker, so please, someone correct me if I'm wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zekecoma

ommat/want - synonym (explains a reason)
doordat - explains a cause

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EwaB74
EwaB74
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And what is the difference between a casue and a reason??? For me it is the same :( Through this I still cannot see the difference...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xMerrie
xMerrie
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In this case, a 'reason' has human influence while a 'cause' has not. Zekecoma is not completely right though. 'Omdat' explains both a reason or a cause, whilst 'doordat' just explains a cause; meaning that sometimes the two are interchangeable.

  • Het feest kon niet doorgaan omdat/doordat de kok ziek was geworden. (oorzaak) - "The party could not carry on, because the cook had become sick." (cause)

  • Ik waarschuw je van tevoren, omdat ik wil voorkomen dat je in de problemen komt. (reden) - "I warn you beforehand, because I want to prevent that you get in trouble." (reason)

  • De jongen zei dat hij het raam had vernield omdat hij daar zin in had. (reden) - "The boy said that he had destroyed the window, because he felt like it" (reason)

Source

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeDubuc

"Doordat", "omdat", "aangezien", and "want" all mean "because". The difference is in the subject/verb order they dictate. "Doordat" and "want" don't require you to invert the clause (as seen above with "doordat ik zwem"). But this is where things get fuzzy for me. "Omdat" and "aangezien" make it so that the subject/verb order is changed in some way. I just don't remember how. Hope this helps you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbigailNat10

The V gets booted from "second" position in the subordinating clause to final position. (I think)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_rxlinguist
_rxlinguist
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I have the very same question. I was wondering if "doordat" means "because" and "aangezien" also means the same, then would "ik ben sterk aangezien ik zwem" also mean the same thing?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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This is what I've understood this far:

Aangezien means 'because of', so after it you'll find a noun phrase (just as in its English counterpart), thus, it's a verbless 'clause'.

Doordat means 'because', and it's a subordinating conjunction. Therefore, you need an 'actual' clause to follow -that is: a clause containing a verb. As the clause that is introduced by doordat is subordinate/dependent, all of its verbs (i.e., the verbs of this clause) must be placed at the end of it.

Note that I talk about clauses, not sentences. This is because a sentence may be formed by more than a clause.

When you only have one clause in a sentence, that clause is a main/independent clause.

When you have two or more clauses in a sentence, one of them will be a main/independent clause, the other(s) may be subordinate/dependent or main/independent. They'll be subordinate if they are introduced by a subordinating conjunction, and main if introduced by a coordinating conjunction.

Coordinating conjunctions: en, maar, of (meaning or), want, dus (which can also be an adverb).

Some subordinating conjunctions are:

Dat,

Doordat,

hoewel

Of (whether)

Omdat,

tenzij,

Terwijl

Voordat

wanneer,

Wie

Zodat 

Zodra

zowel.

For a complete list of subordinating conjunctions, check here: http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=WordOrder.58

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nihaoearth12

I though you swap the verb and object when it does not begin at the start of the sentence. Could someone explain?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TimmyMcGrath

Yeah, I'm in the same boat. I thought that as soon as you inserted 'doordat', the 'subclause' become SOV ... However, as I type this I notice that there's no object in the subclause... Does this mean that it is just SV (subject verb)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Exactly. Remember that some verbs are instransitive (that is, they don't require an object). So, in order to remember it better, when you have a subclause, then all of the verbs in that subclause must be place at the end of the clause.

Hope this helps.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbigailNat10

Thank you! Is it possible that "doordat" is a coordinating conjunction that means because???? My mine would explode. OR, would it be closer syntactically to "for" [that], as "for" is coordinating in English, and it wouldn't trigger the SOV thing that subordinating conjunctions do in Dutch?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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No, doordat is a subordinating conjuction, therefoee it introduces a subordinate clause. In such clauses, all of the verbs must be placed at the end of the clause.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Ooops! 'Therefore'.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkkom

Please can someone explain why it is "doordat ik zwem" rather than "doordat zwem ik"? The notes say that doordat is a subordinating conjunction which changes the word order, so now I'm confused!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobhanWray

Yes, "doordat" is a subordinate conjunction, which means that it sends the verb to the end of the clause, i.e. "doordat ik zwem", instead of "doordat zwem ik".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kkkom

Dank u wel

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SiobhanWray

graag gedaan

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Princess746095

Let me spell it out here ( JUST SO IT LEAVES MY HEAD)

Omdat= because, for, just because Want= because, for, as daar= as, because, for, inasmuch, forasmuch as Wijl= Because, as, since Aangezien= as, since, seeing, whereas, because, inasmuch Doordat= Because

So ALL THESE MEAN BECAUSE AMONG OTHER THINGS THEY MEAN. How in this earth do you keep all that info in your heads database? When each of them has a RULE and who knows what exceptions there are to them? So which is it. Keep in mind this is JUST ONE WORD IN ENGLISH and there are MANY others with this same issue, IN DUTCH? WELL.... (by the way still havent gotten the {van mij= for/from me } part when is it for or from me in a sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tracey843948

It is confusing, isn't it? But in English there isn't just one word either. Sometimes we use "for", though it can sound a bit formal. I am scared for it is dark. I'm going to bed for I am tired. I'd normally use "because" in these sentences, but you can use "for", and the sentences would be grammatically correct...

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Actually, aangezien is more like 'because of'.

Please see my previous comments on this matter.

And, btw:

van mij= 'from me' or 'mine'

voor mij= 'for me'.

Hope this helps.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregLake2
GregLake2
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Why when I wrote "I am strong because I am swimming" it's wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AbigailNat10

While individually the present progressive is interchangeable in English translation (e.g., I eat vs I am eating), your translation is a bit stilted, and not natural in English. I am strong (present) because I swim (not present progressive, more habitual). You do not become strong because you are in the process of currently swimming.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Margareth185142

Why is OMDAT not correct when DOORDAT is correct?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Are you sure you didn't make any other mistakes? Was the word order correct?

1 month ago
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