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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robbiee_88

"The pawn"

December 27, 2012

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jetboy

I think this question was a bit unfair, considering I had just had "Der Bauer" introduced as Farmer only 2 or 3 slides ago. Also, I'm in the category "Occupations" so I don't think we should be introducing Chess terms!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle

Yes, agree. And it's not the first time this situation occurs here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flaniererin

I also agree with jetboy. "Pawn" definition has nothing to do with occupations and was not introduced earlier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/couchdoor

I agree too, but find the multiple meanings here interesting...is pawn a relic from the age of knights and kings? any etymologists here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elitzazarcheva

Not an etymologist but you're right, it's interesting. Especially when I guessed that Bauer would be a construction worker (from Bau, construction), yet it turned out to be a farmer and now a pawn :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duoderSie

yep Bau, bauen, Bauern and Bauernhof are quite confusing. I've always assumed that it was because farmers "build" crops.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/moz.

Agreed with Jetboy. At least introduce its alternate meaning at the beginning or on a separate picture slide.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jphager2

so we see der Bauer as the farmer, the peasant and now the pawn...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Scapeplan

They're essentially the same if you think of feudalism.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tdornelas

In Brazil we use this word, "peão" (pawn), for these cases: the chess piece, the person who mounts horses and take care of the farms (not the farm owner) and the person who works in constructions under the engineers orders.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sr_encendedor

so we do with the word "peón" in Spanish. Valeu pela aclaracao!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cassecou

In Spanish is very common to call someone who works in a farm "peon" as well as in Chess, but it is always for subordinate persons not for farmers whom own the ground. Maybe is the same concept.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robbiee_88

Der Bauer means the farmer no the pawn...right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cayvie

i think calling things like this "unfair" misses the point of how duolingo works.

this doesn't teach language like traditional classes.

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