"Ili kuiras bone kaj rapide."

Translation:They cook well and fast.

3 years ago

31 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rapn21
rapn21
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I always confuse kuiri (to cook) and kuri (to run).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balou67
balou67
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You maybe know some related words… kuiri starts like cuisine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jake3389
jake3389
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I think they are both French words. kuiri = cuisinier, kuri = courir.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grassator97

I'm pretty sure kuri is derived from the Latin word "currere," meaning to run.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Which is also where the French one comes from.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smlnlsn
smlnlsn
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Yep, though kuiri appears to be more closely related to 'cuire' than 'cuisiner'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cleanthe3
Cleanthe3
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indeed , so is there an esperanto word for cuire ?....I don't how to translate it in english...make a food not raw ...? or it is the meaning of cuisiner ? ... I'm confused !! ;)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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  • 1761

French cuisiner; English to cook; Esperanto kuiri
[ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kuiri#Esperanto ]

French courir; English to run; Esperanto kuri
[ https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kuri#Esperanto ]

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cleanthe3
Cleanthe3
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thanks for the answer . I don't understand how wiktionary works so I find reta-vortaro.de and majstro.com .

If I understand well : to prepare a meal - to cook -cuisiner -kuiri (as you said) and to make sth not raw (to bake ?) - cuire- kuiriĝi (or baki perhaps ?) . So many words so close..:)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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Yes, there are different specific words for the different methods of making or preparing food. I was only focusing on the difference between kuiri and kuri and their origins because the words end up sounding similar to each other in Esperanto.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flyinhawaiian_3

Can anyone help me distinguish when to use E ending in bone or rapide vs an A ending?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zylbath
Zylbath
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The a-ending is only for adjectives. The e-ending is for adverbs. So if the adjective/adverb describes a noun like in 'The house is red.' or 'The blue monkey' then the ending is '-a'. If it describes how the action of a verb is like in: 'He runs strangely' or 'She screams loudly.', the ending is '-e'. In English the ending would be most of the time '-ly' then. When that comes, it is very probable that '-e' comes in Esperanto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flyinhawaiian_3

Dankon!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Druif
Druif
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Is saying "They cook good and fast" really wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xneb
Xneb
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Yes, "good" is an adjective and "well" is an adverb, and seeing as it describing a verb then the adverb has to be used

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Druif
Druif
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Thanks, I didn't know that :-) In Dutch you can use "goed" as an adverb and adjective.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Same with English, much to the confusion of many.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smlnlsn
smlnlsn
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In English, 'good' can only be used in the adverb sense with verbs of sense. Saying 'that smells good' is correct and you mean it has a pleasant scent. However 'that smells well' means it has very good perception of scent. The same applies for 'feeling good' or 'sounding good'.

Using 'good' as an adverb in any other case is informal, but used by some at a varying level depending on location and community. Often, 'good' as an adverb is used by accident (i.e. informal 'doing good' v. the correct 'doing well').

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rae.F
Rae.F
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If something has a pleasant scent and you say "That smells good", then "smells" is a stative verb and "good" is a predicate adjective that describes the subject. It's not an adverb that modifies the verb.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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You made my case better than I could have. thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k1r4e
k1r4e
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Is anyone interested in becoming friends on Facebook to practice/ help each other? I know i could use someone to practice with.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbrock64
jbrock64
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What is your face book name

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k1r4e
k1r4e
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Kira jungklaus

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ljburrow
ljburrowPlus
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Bone kaj rapide? Ambaŭ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorBohannon

I've never heard someone say they cook "well" and quickly... EVER! That just sounds weird!

Everyone I know would say: They cook good and 'fast' they might use 'quickly' instead if they were feeling pretentious that day.

Regardless, this course is supposed to teach Esperanto and determine if we understand it adequately not critique our use of improper English grammar!

That being said "They cook good and quickly" is a good translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/flyinhawaiian_3

Then report it if you think it should be correct. Also keep in mind that you're not simply translating things literally from esperanto to english. Its a different language and people may say things that sound odd in english but sound perfectly normal in esperanto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConorBohannon

I realize that. A literal (word for word) translation of the question from Esperanto to English would be "They cook goodly and rapidly". The "oddness" isn't in the Esperanto its in their English interpretation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aleksescomu
aleksescomu
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you are right, i have seen those good used as adverbs... well, try reporting it but I finding only pages that point out that is incorrect English (usually learning a foreign language helps you learning and understanding better your own language)

Notice that if you google "he cooks well and" you get 58.100 results, and if it's "he cooks good and" you get 10.800. I wrote "and" so I don't get results like "he cooks good chicken", but it's not the perfect solution, as i still get results as "he cooks good and tasty food"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csi
csi
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It doesn't sound weird to me. Most people I know would say they cook well, or they would say "I'm a good cook" or they would say "I'm good at cooking." But they wouldn't say "I cook good." Unless they also say things like "I'm real hungry."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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I speaks English good?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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I said something much like this while working the grill, recently. "These burgers are cooking well, and fast (quickly)"

It's all in how one is willing to look at the world.

3 years ago
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