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  5. "An dtuilleann sí airgead gac…

"An dtuilleann airgead gach lá?"

Translation:Does she earn money every day?

June 3, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJMurph333

Oibríonn sí go crua ar an airgead.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Mar sin b’fhearr duit caitheamh go maith léi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciaratiara

"She works hard for the money.." "But preferably she is wearing it well.." insert your own lyrics & sing along...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Caith le is a phrasal verb, so it has a different meaning than caith does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciaratiara

Cad é an t-aistriúchán: Caith le? Le do thoil. Nil sé priobháideach gach rud. Nil sé pearsanta.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

"In that case, you had better treat her well"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

I guess I really should have written it as "So you better treat her right".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciaratiara

Go raibh maith agat, Knocksedan.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dantfinn

What is the unconjugated verb here? "Tuill"? I thought "cosain" was earn in Irish. Is this a common usage?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Yes, tuill is the usual dictionary headword form of dtuilleann. (Since Irish has no infinitives, its verbs have no unconjugated forms; tuill is the second-person singular imperative.) The NEID suggests that tuill is a common translation of “earn”. Cosain has other meanings as well as “earn”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stolenchild

can "airgead" also refer to the colour silver?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SigurdS

the color would be "airgid" but the material is also "airgead" (directly derived from the latin argentum - thanks for the crib by the way)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B-mhongoadh

Can this also mean 'make money' or do you use 'dean' for that? and can you say 'go crua' or should you say ' go dain'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Knocksedan

airgid a dhéanamh is used for "to make money".

to make money hand over fist
cual airgid a dhéanamh
lab airgid a dhéanamh
do shaibhreas a dhéanamh

to make money is easy, to make a lot of money is another thing altogether
tá sé éasca airgead a dhéanamh, rud difriúil ar fad é go leor airgid a dhéanamh

her sole aim was to make money
airgead a dhéanamh an t-aon aidhm a bhí aici
ní raibh de rún aici ach airgead a dhéanamh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B-mhongoadh

Brilliant! go hiontach, go raibh mile maith agat.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanStanDaMan

So where does the word "Does" come in? Is it implied?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

In English, "Does" and "Do" aren't verbs when used to create a question like this, they are just interrogative participles, the equivalent of "an".

She reads -> Does she read? (the verb is still "read", not "does")
Léann sí -> An léann sí?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanStanDaMan

That must be what confuses me, since I think of "an" as translated to English singular "the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1446

There are 3 common uses of "an" - before a noun, it's the singular definite article, before a verb it's the present tense interrogative particle, and when it is used with a hyphen, it's an intensifier ("an-mhór" - "very big", "an-chostasach" - "very expensive". It can also be used with a noun - "an-chóisir" - "a great party", "an-jab" - "nice work, great job, well done!", "an-lá" - "a great day", "an-drochlá" - "a terrible day")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanStanDaMan

go raibh míle maith agat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NancyAnn11

Why is each wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Onyx.Rose

It shouldn't be...report it. It's in the drop-down menu....

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