"Multaj bonuloj laboras en ĉi tiu laborejo."

Translation:Many good people work in this workplace.

June 3, 2015

28 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeBlamires

I used "factory" and it was marked down. I suppose a factory is a workplace but not all workplaces are factories.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Williams_Dakota

What's the difference between ulo and homo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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ulo is more conversational.
homo is more clinical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ScottBoggs3

So probably:

<pre>ulo = man homo = human </pre>

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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"Ulo" is more like "person/guy/fellow/chap/bloke/dude" (only gender-neutral). But yeah, "homo" is more like "human".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouisSepdekdu

Yoda ulo estas, sed homo ne estas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arcxjo

Homo is used as a word, ulo is a suffix identifying a person with the root.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Ulo can stand on its own, though. See the other comments for details.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BossLearner87

Bonulo estas oksimoro


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zerozeroone

1/8 of a bonulo, apparently.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nelomah

ĉi tiu - means "this," but literally, "this that." Is that simply a grammatical oddity? Do other languages have something like this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marko246521

Yes, other languages do this. For example, in French ce is used with masculine, singular nouns. It translates into English as this or that. If you want to be more specific and mean this you put -ci on the end of the noun. If you want to mean that you put -là at the end of the noun. So, ce garçon can mean this boy or it can mean that boy. However, ce garçon-ci means this boy and ce garçon-là means that boy. (It applies, too, with the masculine singular before vowels, feminine and plurals: cet, cette, ces and cettes.) Admittedly, in French ce/cet/cette/ces/cettes and -ci or -là are separated but the principle is the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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I'd forgotten that French does that. Thanks for the refresher!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Logr8

"Celui-ci" et "celui-là", c'est pas synonyme ? Quelle est la différence ? And same question for english. "This one" and "that one", what's the difference? I'm french speaker, by the way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Si quelque chose est à côté de toi, tu dit "C'est ici".

Si quelque chose est loin de toi, tu dit "C'est là bas".

Ils ne sont pas les mêmes.

And in English, "ici" is "here" and "là bas" is there.

This one here, that one there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Marko246521

We were talking about making it clear whether you mean "this" or "that" in languages that do not make this clear as in English. No one mentioned more complex expressions such as "this one", etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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Logr8 asked,

"Celui-ci" et "celui-là", c'est pas synonyme ? Quelle est la différence ?

Which means, "This one here" and "that one there" aren't synonyms? What's the difference?

That is the question I answered.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zerozeroone

According to https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/%C4%89i#Esperanto, it comes from the French and Italian proximal pronouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
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That's ĉi per se, though. The question was about the phrase ĉi tiu as a whole.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zerozeroone

Well, you'd really have to have a French speaker chime in to be sure.

One of the examples given for ci is cet homme-ci ― this man. Using Google Translate (gasp, the horror!), it shows cet homme as that man and cet homme-ci as this man. So the Esperanto usage seems to match.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PawelBaj

Don't trust Google Translate too much. Anyway, French and Esperanto demonstratives aren't 100% alike. In French you can specify proximity or distance, in Esperanto you can only specify proximity.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesHynde1

"tiu ĉi laborejo" is marked as incorrect. As I understood it, there is no difference between "ĉi tiu" and "tiu ĉi". Is this not the case? Is there a difference between these two constructions, and if so, what is the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

A full sentence would be easier to comment on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

I notice the person who downvoted this comment didn't find it easy to comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatsinTogs

Ha-ha, that "bonuloj" blows my mind


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatsinTogs

Is it possible in Esperanto to say, say, "malbonuloj", "virbonuloj", etc.?

I mean, is the language that limitless?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LouisSepdekdu

Yes, as long as it makes sense, you can add prefixes. I found 136 "malbonulo(j)" in Tekstaro, but also "nebonulo", "plejbonulo", "maplibonulo" and "gebonuloj".

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