"Miaj gepatroj iras kien ili volas."

Translation:My parents go where they want.

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Loxiney
  • 12
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4

Omg annoying English :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NellieMendoza
  • 13
  • 10
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

"My parents go where they want to" is not correct? D:

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bghull

Your answer implies "...where they want to (go)" - it's the "to (go)" part that is incorrect here, because the verb is simply "volas".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vytah
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1266

In "where they want to", "to" can belong to either "where" (a remnant of a Germanic preposition-derived adverbial phrase) or "want" (to imply an omitted infinitive).

Both interpretations are proper English, and it this context, both mean the same and translate to the same.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AjxojLerni

You sure about that? The former doesn't seem right. If it were, then the sentence "My parents go where to." would be a complete idea, but it isn't.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vytah
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 1266

English doesn't work that way. "I don't know what you are talking about" is syntatically correct, while "I don't know what about" is not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grokford
  • 16
  • 12
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2

The "to" refers back to the original verb go. It's presence is correct so long as the first verb is there to be referenced back to.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siramnot
  • 11
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7
  • 4

What's wrong with "My parents go wherever they like"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/csi
  • 18
  • 11
  • 11
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

I guess because "volas" means "want/wants", not "like".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AjxojLerni

Well, correct translations should convey equivalent messages, as a whole, not necessarily exact literal words, so Siramnot's translation satisfies that fairly, IMO. The way he used "like" translates to "wish/will/want" but can potentially mean its other definition, "enjoy/appreciate".

Maybe duolingo is trying to keep the correct options narrow, since the latter definition is an unconventional use...or maybe they didn't consider Siramnot's phrasing when they conjured up their answer bank.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Enyalie
  • 11
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3

Margo... jen frazo por mi! :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eversome

Do you only need a comma if a correlative is used after a noun, a subordinate clause?

3 years ago
Learn Esperanto in just 5 minutes a day. For free.