Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Hvor går farfar?"

Translation:Where is my paternal grandfather going?

3 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ag3n7_z3r0
ag3n7_z3r0
  • 17
  • 13
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2

Hiccup in the audio of farfar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phantasmus

Where is 'my' in this sentence?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/otsogutxi
otsogutxi
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5

I love how in Norwegian to say 'grand something' you say it twice like farfar or barnebarna. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
Mod
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3
  • 500

Farfar literally means the father of the father. Farmor means the mother of the father. Same logic with morfar og mormor.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/otsogutxi
otsogutxi
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 12
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jayagmon
jayagmon
  • 17
  • 17
  • 13
  • 9
  • 8
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5

So in Norwegian there's no different between "where" and "where to", like Swedish has? (Var / Vart)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 31

Short answer: No

Long answer: We do have a way of making a distinction, but it's by adding additional words and is neither necessary nor used all that much in writing:

"Hvor skal du hen?"
"Where are you going (to)?"

"Hvor er de henne?"
"Where are they (at)?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jorun-la

In my dialect, it is very common to say "hen" and "henne", though it is not necessary :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NorskSpiller

Audio is a little messed up on farfar.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Karl_Dilkington

Hmmm, I thought "går" could only refer to walking. Guess it can mean "going" in the general sense as well?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vildand91

Yes, it definitely can! For example is "how are you?" translated to "hvordan går det?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rzlourenco

Could this be "Where goes grandfather?"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jorun-la

In my opinion, that does not sound like a good sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arnold511125

Why is a bad translation : "where does a grandfather go?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gidget84

That would be 'Hvor går en farfar?'

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Libor
Libor
  • 13
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 10
  • 10
  • 5
  • 5
  • 3

En farfar = a grandpa also there may be a habitual norwegian part missing

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grilled_Bear

Han går på et bedre sted...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gidget84

går til* et bedre

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LavethWolf
LavethWolf
  • 25
  • 22
  • 16
  • 15
  • 10
  • 8
  • 6
  • 625

Opp dit, barnet mitt... opp dit.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alesita600160

Where is "my" in the question???

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 3
  • 31

It's implied. This can be done with most family members you typically only have one of.

6 months ago