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  5. "Hvor går farfar?"

"Hvor går farfar?"

Translation:Where is my paternal grandfather going?

June 3, 2015

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1weeksober

Hiccup in the audio of farfar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Phantasmus

Where is 'my' in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pslaslripnip

That would be "farfaren min" or "min farfar" though


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

It's only in the English because you can't refer to someone as "paternal grandfather" as you can refer to someone as simply "grandfather", and the Norwegian clearly doesn't refer to any paternal grandfather other than the speaker's.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/otsogutxi

I love how in Norwegian to say 'grand something' you say it twice like farfar or barnebarna. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig

Farfar literally means the father of the father. Farmor means the mother of the father. Same logic with morfar og mormor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jayagmon

So in Norwegian there's no different between "where" and "where to", like Swedish has? (Var / Vart)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Short answer: No

Long answer: We do have a way of making a distinction, but it's by adding additional words and is neither necessary nor used all that much in writing:

"Hvor skal du hen?"
"Where are you going (to)?"

"Hvor er de henne?"
"Where are they (at)?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorun-la

In my dialect, it is very common to say "hen" and "henne", though it is not necessary :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NorskSpiller

Audio is a little messed up on farfar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AsparrowIt

Hei går vs skul ? Do they both mean "to go" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElectricWeasel

Yes, but 'går' can also mean 'walk' so I'm not sure if they're synonymous or there's a preference for one over the other


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustSafira

Why is the paternal part necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

In this case just to show you fully understand the Norwegian which has an idiomatic colloquial single word for each of the four grandparents.

I believe Norwegian lacks a word to ambiguously refer to both maternal and fraternal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karl_Dilkington

Hmmm, I thought "går" could only refer to walking. Guess it can mean "going" in the general sense as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vildand91

Yes, it definitely can! For example is "how are you?" translated to "hvordan går det?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sam278989

"Where is my paternal grandfather going?" said no native speaker of English ever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

True but here the Norwegian's job is to be idiomatic and the English's job is to show you fully understood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alesita600160

Where is "my" in the question???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

It's implied. This can be done with most family members you typically only have one of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hippietrail

Because the English would be ungrammatical without it and it's clear no other grandfather is meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvangelineM14

Is farfar supposed to be pronounced like that..?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rzlourenco

Could this be "Where goes grandfather?"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jorun-la

In my opinion, that does not sound like a good sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grilled_Bear

Han går på et bedre sted...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gidget84

går til* et bedre


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arnold511125

Why is a bad translation : "where does a grandfather go?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gidget84

That would be 'Hvor går en farfar?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Libor

En farfar = a grandpa also there may be a habitual norwegian part missing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LavethWolf

Opp dit, barnet mitt... opp dit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrKuczar

He just went out to buy McDonald's.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samual5200

Perhaps I've watched one too many American films during this lockdown, but I ended up translating this to "How goes granddad".

Whilst I can appreciate it's not the intended translation, I was wondering can "Hvor går farfar" translate to that also?


[deactivated user]

    In English we don't distinguish between maternal and paternal grandparents.

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