1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Buona fortuna e buon diverti…

"Buona fortuna e buon divertimento!"

Translation:Good luck and have fun!

October 1, 2013

60 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

I must say despite its oddities I'm often very impressed with DL's subtleties: I wrote "Good luck and have a good time" which is far from literal but I thought I'd try it as a good English translation. And it was accepted. COMMENT EDITED FOR MY APPALLING ODDITY - A TOTALLY UNMERITED APOSTROPHE!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rafforza

It, however, does not accept 'good fortune and good fun' which, although a bit archaic, is still correct i'd say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wshvet

No... I noticed that. (sigh) Wish I knew when meaningful trumped literal and vice versa!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJTitmus

My clumsy literal translation 'good luck and good fun' was accepted today but being an english native speaker I would normally say 'good luck and have fun'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daphne656741

I’m glad your good luck and good fun was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LesterOlso

They still do not accept good luck and fun which is less needlessly repetitive. August 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoAFUu

It is not repetitive - it is not correct English to say "good fun". You would say "have fun".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joopedrofe527667

That's the better translation that would be


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swampsparrow

It also accepts "… and have fun".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/swampsparrow

Actually, "have fun" is a perfectly good translation. It's one of the ways a native speaker of English would express the sentiment, that and "have a good time".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeri123

and yet, i wrote "buona fortuna è buon divertimento" and they marked me wrong. I have to insist good luck IS good fun LOL


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angie140400

Continued good luck for you Silkwarrior!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/baloosnafoo

Fortuna can't be translated as fortune??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carli1195

should be, though 'good luck' is more common and 'good fortune', as a set phrase of well-wishing, is a bit archaic


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgbachand

But of course it can!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JacobusUys

It's a phrase and just how they talk.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/reginadel

I translated as "enjoy yourself" and it was not accepted. Does anyone know the difference between enjoy yourself and have fun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carli1195

if i was the owl i would have accepted, can't see the meaningful difference as neither are literal translations


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iansimpson919

If you were the owl, you would have used the subjunctive mood.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daphne656741

Ha ha I know what you mean. It gets annoying sometimes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CanKaracan84

I heard that wishing good luck is a bad thing among Italians because they believe such wish would bring bad luck. Is it true?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Imelda266520

(Native italian speaker) we don't think that this word brings bad luck. We think that "in bocca al lupo" (which means literally "go into the mouth of the wolf", but in italian means also "good luck") brings bad luck and so we reply :" creep the wolf".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulmacd

I thought "crepi il lupo" (the reply to "in bocca al lupo") meant "may the wolf die" (third person imperative/subjunctive of "crepare").


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AJ_2097

The literal English translation of "... Good fun" makes no sense!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaAngeli2

If I remember well ,years ago, GEORGE CLOONEY, made a film "Good night and good luck".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErnestGree4

"Good luck, and enjoy" ...???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robin4duo

Not being native English speaker, can you please help me understanding if there is anything wrong with my answer: "Good luck and lot of fun!" which DL did not accept. It is just enough to let me know if this is something a native speaker would never have used... Grazie mille.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wshvet

No, a native speaker would not phrase it quite like that - although a possible sentence would be "Good luck and HAVE a lot of fun". But for English, there needs to be a verb in the second bit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robin4duo

Thanks. It is great how learning Italian helps me improving the English at the same time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomas.rueda

I was literal in this one, since one or two exercises before "fortune" was translated "fortuna", and Duolingo is SO literal that it gets boring. But, surprise! This time I was un"luck"y.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daphne656741

Why should Buon divertimento mean have fun?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pat448778

"Good fortune" means the same as "good luck." Interchangeable, in fact. Duo needs to accept both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulmacd

It may mean the same, but I think people might look at you rather strangely if you start wishing them "Good fortune and good fun", mixing a rather old fashioned phrase with a more modern one, so in this particular sentence I don't think they are really interchangeable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VamsVams

Why no avere? Like: avere buon divertamento


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NathanCohe208206

I got this right because it just seemed to need the "have" but could a native Italian speaker explain why the verb is not needed ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/t_s_c

Shouldn't this be "good luck and good fun"? There is no verb here. Is this a mistake or an idiom?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Viaggiatore

Every language has its familiar expressions. "Good luck and good fun" makes sense but we don't say it that way and we notice if a foreign speaker does. In that case the right translation is the one that sounds good in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaMilanese

"Have fun" is correct. Can't explain why (maybe a mothertongue would be more helpful here).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LatecomerLaurie

(American English speaker) "Have fun - " It's just how we say it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulmacd

Same in English and Scottish English: "Good luck and have fun". (Native English and Scottish English speaker)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dnovinc

I agree with ValeriaDiG1. I am not a native English speaker, but to me "good luck and good fun" sounds really strange, a better expression is "good luck and have fun".

btw @Valeria madrelingua = native speaker


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daphne656741

Just seems odd. Have fun you’d think would be fai divertimento or just divertimento perhaps. These oddities in Italian really annoy me sometimes and makes me want to give up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vic18653

I put good fortune and it wasnt accepted go figure its italian


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Puzzle36714

I don't like this translation. I think if fa or fate was used then "have fun" would be more appropriate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JSMcCarter

Wrong translation..... ..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertWill713455

she pronounces "divertimento" (sm) as "divertimentA"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DuoLiNxo

Unfortunately it is not accepting "glhf"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martina92189

...and much fun is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurtulusaygun

didn't accept as true "good luck and have gun". yes, duolingo. all world should drop the gun.

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.