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  5. "Det er en edderkopp."

"Det er en edderkopp."

Translation:It is a spider.

June 4, 2015

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eva.lyus

can someone explain, where this word comes from? is there a deeper meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dauddaud

Little late but you have the word in English as well. It's "attercop" there. It derives from old english ator=poison and copp=head. In "The Hobbit" (the bok not the horrible horrible movies) Bilbo calls the spiders "attercop" to mock them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tetraoxid

Whoa, I do remember that scene now. And I read the book in German, so the word may have been really popular once... PS.: The films aren't that bad, if you are able to shut up the part of your brain that's always comparing them to the book while watching. PPS.: I love the word; it takes my irrational fear of those foul beasts away and makes me smile :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/meiasmedidas

Thank you, that was really helpful. Now I'll definitely remember the word 'edderkopp'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2341

Charlotte er en edderkopp og hun har en tryllevev... heldigvis for Wilbur.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Karmen.Han

That was my fav kids' book. Have an ingot!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eweesner

Since the noun (en edderkopp) is masculine, why isn't den used at the beginning of the sentence instead of det? I thought that det was only used when referring to ungendered nouns.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

When referring to something unknown, we default to the neuter version.

At the point where "det" is used in the sentence, the reader/listener still doesn't know that "det" is going to be a spider. If they did, then the sentence would be a bit pointless.

"Det (introducing an unknown) er en edderkopp. Den (pointing back to edderkopp) er farlig."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eweesner

Thanks for the explanation!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlbertLinguist

What's the function of double consonants in Norwegiam?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Regney
  • 2341

As a general rule, the vowel in a word with a single consonant is a long vowel, and the vowel in a word with a double consonant is a short vowel. Bear in mind that "long" and "short" in Norwegian isn't identical to "long" and "short" in English. Here are some examples:

Maten er varm. (The food is hot.) - The long a in maten is drawn out a little: ma-aten.
Matten er ren. (The mat is clean.) - The short a in matten is said quickly.
Fint, takk! (Fine, thanks!) - The a in takk is pronounced quickly.
Fint tak! (Nice roof!) - The a is drawn out.

There are, of course, exceptions, including til, om and hvis. They're not drawn out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crimsonros2

this word is funny to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheshireCat75

Why isn't "THIS is a spider" accepted ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

this = dette (n), denne (m/f)
that/it = det (n), den (m/f)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CheshireCat75

ok, got it. Thank you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/artur381539

what is the difference between this and that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

"This" is used to refer/point to things that are closer to you, and "that" is used for things that are farther away, either physically, emotionally or figuratively.

Examples:

"This cup (over here/in my hand) is blue, while that cup (over there) is blue."
"This bicycle is mine; that one is yours."
"I think this idea is better than that idea."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Bare hyggelig!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielingua

Wow, even the word "edderkopp" makes it sound menacing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eddsworld_Doodle

Ya best run if ya don't wanna get bit

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