"Ele passou no teste."

Translation:He passed the test.

October 1, 2013

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/LucianoGra17

I am from Brazil, "Passar no teste" means to be succeed on the test, "Passar o teste" means to give the test to someone.

Obs.: I am still learning english, so please ignore possible mistakes.

December 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Hector290697

Don't worry my Latino brother. I am from Puerto Rico so English isn't my native language either.

December 13, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

Excellent ! Thanks for this "dica".

December 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoGarcez

Why "He's passed the test" is incorrect?

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

It is translated the same way.

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoGarcez

Ok, but why Duolingo says it's incorrect?

February 16, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

Just report =)

February 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrianoGarcez

That's what I wanted to know, if it's correct. Thanks.

February 17, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/skyted

"Ele passou no teste" seems to me an unusual construction. "Ele passou o teste" seems more usual.

October 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulenrique

Really? Maybe in Portugal. Passar no teste = to be succeed. Passar o test = give it to someone.

October 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/skyted

I was too quick to comment. Phrases without context seems strange sometimes. BTW by entering an expression or phrase in the search box at the website http://www.linguee.com.br/, the expression or phrase is returned with multiple contexts and applications in many different sentences--very helpful.

October 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/MailyGuimaraes

Agreed, it should definitely be " Ele passou no teste"

July 26, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/emeyr

"Passar no teste" means to succeed. Could "passar o test" simply mean to take the test?

October 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo

Idk about Brazilian Portuguese, but in EP we would simply say, «Fiz o teste.» from the infinitive «fazer».

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Lng52-._

Are "teste" and "exame" the same?

April 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/ZuMako8_Momo

Just as much as "test" and "exam" are, yes

April 1, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ceezey

@Adriano Garcez - He's is basically He+is in a shortened form so your sentence would read, 'He is passed the test' which is not proper English grammar

March 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertRube1

As a native American English speaker, I can also think of "He's passed the test" to be "He HAS passed the test", which is proper informal English ever since the 17th century. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_auxiliaries_and_contractions, the section Contracted auxiliaries

April 20, 2017
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