"Це коштує сорок сім гривень."

Translation:It costs forty-seven hryvnias.

June 4, 2015

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QTkula

Funny how коштує sounds like the verb cost.

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shady_arc

Which is no surprise, given that the Polish word comes from German kosten, and the Ukranian verb is very likely to come from the Polish word. :)

However, the link between cost and kosten is not so obvious, and, from what I could find on the web, they are not related.

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vinnfred

What I found:
cost - from Middle English cost, coust, from costen (“to cost”)
costen - from Middle English costnien, from Old English costnian, subsidiary form of Old English costian (“to tempt, try, prove, examine”), from Proto-Germanic kustōną (“to try, taste”), from Proto-Indo-European ǵews- (“to enjoy, taste”). Cognate with German kosten (“to taste”).

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joncoded

probably also related to "me gustas" :)

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QTkula

kosten and cost being not cognates would be (is) very strange..

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vinnfred

I think they are cognates :)

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Warao1

I spelled 'hryven' instead of 'hryvnyas'. Is that wrong?

October 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GledBernardelli

In English, yes.

January 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NessaNessaJoy

Гривния, гривні, гривень?

January 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nomen11

I also dont understand when to use the three

August 25, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Addicted359

1, 234, and more than 5 I think

September 27, 2017
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