"Hva skriver hun?"

Translation:What is she writing?

3 years ago

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Anuan_Rithe
Anuan_Rithe
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Note to self; norwegian grammar, especially questions, make much more sense if you imagine a burly viking asking the question and extrapolate from that. What writes she = what does she write?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cenacsigel

Really helpful. Takk

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PuertoRico_7213

Thank you, I was having trouble with this but now I get it. I understand when you say hun skriver(she writes) but the order of questions confused me but now I get them. Thanks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anuan_Rithe
Anuan_Rithe
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Keep up the good work. You'll find it's reversed for statements vs questions. so hun elsker ham would be 'she loves him' but elsker hun ham? would be 'she loves him?'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisa703217

Maybe a bit off subject, but is cursive or print used more when writing this language?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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As far as I know, children still start out learning print letters in the first grade (or earlier), and then learn cursive in the second or third grade (at least I did), but there is probably some variation.

Most people I know write a mix of the two, with the cursive 'f' and 't' being the first to go as it's less time consuming to cross them with a separate stroke. Women tend to retain more of the cursive, perhaps because it's seen as prettier and more feminine than the print.

I think there's a decline in the usage/mastery of cursive among younger people, partially because there is less focus on it in schools, but mostly because everyone's typing on a keyboard these days.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991
Luke_5.1991
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The exact same thing happens in the US. I was taught cursive when I was nine, but I don't think it's taught pretty much anywhere nowadays. Certain letters are extremely rare to see in cursive, like the capital "G".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
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Yeah, some of the cursive capital letters are definitely reserved for birthday cards here as well. I read an article not long ago about how beneficial writing cursive is, so we better bring it back!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scintilla72
Scintilla72
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I would think the capital "G" would be one of the most commonly seen -- it's on every General Mills cereal box. :-P

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/razordead

With silent d's after consonants, how do you hear the difference between hun & hund?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mabynke
mabynke
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Sorry, Gary_Kotka, but their pronunciation is completely identical in almost all Norwegian dialects. You're right that according to normal pronunciation rules, «hun» would have a long u due to the single consonant at the end, but this is one of many exceptions.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gary_Kotka

Ok, thx for clarifying this matter. This is why I like to start my comments with "Correct me if I'm wrong, but..." =)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gary_Kotka

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think 'hun' is pronounced with a distuingishably longer 'u' than 'hund'. I also believe there are cases when you have to look at the context and draw your own conclusions (I think all languages must have some of these cases, some more than others.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marylebone12

I can barely hear the "hun" after skriver in the fast audio. Is there some grammatical blending of these two words here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diogo.Alvarez
Diogo.Alvarez
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In Norwegian, is there a distinction between what we call Simple Present and Present Continuous in English? Or is it like French, for example, where you get it from context? e.g. "Hva skriver hun?" can mean "What does she write?" (as in she is a writer and I wanna know what kind of books she writes) and "What is she writing?" depending on the context?

Cheers!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mabynke
mabynke
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No, there is no such grammatical distinction. That information is either implied through context or given using more words, such as «She writes every day» or «She was writing when he called». The latter example would of course require the preterite tense («hun skrev»).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Diogo.Alvarez
Diogo.Alvarez
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Thank you very much, mabynke

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sogmogfog

Is the verb always in the second position in Norwegian?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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Norwegian is a V2 language, so in general: Yes.

(Except for questions, imperative and subjunctive(archaic))

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sogmogfog

Takk :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Presumably you just mean Yes/No questions, not ones like this example.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fveldig
fveldig
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Yes, I didn't mean all questions, but to make a question you often reverse the order of the subject and the verb, except if it starts with a question word, like 'hvem', 'hva' & 'hvor.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peorlandi
peorlandi
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Tusen takk Cameron, very interesting and useful material

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nick885950

Its hard to tell with the bot voice, are the R's silent?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidBrown348670

They kind of sound silent, bur i think that it is a kind of light sound that is made with the tongue. It is hard for english speakers, but try holding your tongue to the top of your mouth while you pronounce the letter before the "r."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gruamaire
gruamaire
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reminds me of the Irish for writing: "scríobh"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaptainFacePunch

Hva hun scriver? Why hun at the end

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Delphinine

In Norwegian, you switch the order of the verb and the subject in questions so that the verb goes first:

Skriver hun brevet? Is she writing the letter?

When you have a "wh-" question, you put the "wh-" word in front of the verb. This means that the subject ends up trailing after both the "wh-" word and the verb, as in:

Hva skriver hun? What is she writing?

Edit: CameronAvacado posted a link to a concise write-up of basic Norwegian grammar rules earlier in this thread; I think it's pretty cool. :-)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gabslefloc

Is scriver writing or typing ? Djolingo says typing in the context of the sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jan355441
Jan355441
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Seems like norwegian grammar is really close to german grammar. In german it would be the same word order: "Hva skriver hun?" = "Was schreibt sie?"

1 month ago
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