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  5. "Sofia kaj Adamo estas Espera…

"Sofia kaj Adamo estas Esperantistoj."

Translation:Sofia and Adamo are Esperanto speakers.

June 4, 2015

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WyattMrozk

Fun fact: Sofia and Adam are the names of two of Ludwik Zamenhof's children.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ItsDinter

Surprised that Esperantists was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EricRied

Was about to comment this. I'm happy it was; it's a nice sounding term.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zdVs

I learned a new word in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simon_Baumann

Why is it "AdamO" and not simply "Adam"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/theViking98

This comes from the Esperanto page on Duolingo: ESPERANTO NAMES People who speak Esperanto generally use their own names, but sometimes choose a name that is easier to pronounce in Esperanto, or an Esperanto nickname. Names for men in Esperanto generally end in -o, and nicknames in -ĉjo. A man named David could decide to use David, Davido, or the nickname Daĉjo. For a woman, Esperanto names can end in -a or -o, and nicknames end in -njo. A woman named Susan could use Susan, Suzana, Suzano, or the nickname Sunjo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KxngDeo.

Since my name is Deo I'll just leave it that way :P


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tiger8255

"Deĉjo" does sound pretty cool though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1045

So can I choose Alnelo as my Esperanto name too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

I don't think that violates phonotactics, so go for it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/csi

And as a nickname: Alnjo :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrewgtreantos

I think you should use "Alnela," as it sounds more beautiful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1045

Well, can "Alnela" apply for males?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seraphim-of-Ilum

If it doesn't, it does now!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Astronomy487

It cannot apply for males - "Alnela" wouldn't work in any way. You could be "Alnelo", though!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaneDoyle2000

My name is Shane, so could I write my name as Ŝane?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouranikos

Why not 'Ŝejn(o)'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

Sxen. Esperanto doesn't have silent letters the way English does, and the vowels are closer to the Spanish pronunciation than English. The way you wrote it, that would be pronounced "shah-nay".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/arifahjf

My name is Arifah, Arnjo sounds cool


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

Is it really wrong to say "Sofia and Adamo speak Esperanto"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nudpiedo

Yes, it what meant in the sense of belonging to the Esperanto movement (being an esperantist) instead of the fact of speak the language (which is not mentioned in the sentence)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

Hm. Even though the official translation is they "are Esperanto speakers"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheRealFlenuan

"They are Esperanto-speakers" and "They speak Esperanto" aren't completely interchangeable; although they convey similar information, they have distinct meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flavio_do_Brasil

"Esperantisto" is Esperanto speaker,ok. How do you say "speaker" in Esperanto?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

parolanto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterusAgustus

So would can you say Esperantistoj prolantoj for Esperanto speakers?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

The way you have it is redundant. "Esperantisto" already means "Esperanto speaker". I think it would be more like "parolanto de Esperanto".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonathan698526

if my name is Jonathan in esperanto should my name be Gionatan. A cool nickname could be Gionj or Gionoj


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew2569

I think you want Ĝonatano. It needs to end in an o, and the Gio would be pronounced Ghi-oh, two syllables with a hard g.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshLingo1800

John or Jonathan in Esperanto is Johano (YOH-HAH-NOH) and a nickname for that could be Joĉjo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeSanMartin

How do I say "Mike" in Esperanto? Miĥaelĉjo? Thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

The Esperanto version of Michael is Mikelo. I suppose you could shorten that to Miko.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ratrick

I've heard somewhere that another word for Esperantisto is Esperantano. Is this wrong or are they interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpiralStat

Sofia and Adamo need to date


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

Er, no. They're brother and sister, Zamenhof's kids.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SpiralStat

ok i feel weird right now rest in pepperonis


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouranikos

Esperantaj incest zombies! What could be better?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/claaaarRaaaa

Why is it not "Sofia and Adamo estas Esperantistojn"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

You might want to read that again.

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/medaght

No accusative (-n) when you use the verb “estas.”

Sofia kaj Adamo estas Esperantistoj. (S and A are Esperanto speakers.) Sofia kaj Adamo manĝas pomojn. (S and A eat apples.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

"Esti/to be" is a verb of state, not action. "Esperantistoj" is the subject complement, not the direct object. Nothing is being done to "Esperantistoj", we're just equating "Sofia kaj Adamo" with that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheRealFlenuan

It should be correct to say "speakers of Esperanto".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amuzulo

You're right and this is now accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dinlenmek

just out of curiosity, how come the answer "sophia kaj adamo..." not get accepted? like in the hypothetical situation where someone's name is sophia, even if the name phonetically is comfortable to pronounce, would you change the "ph" to f?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

The "ph" digraph does not exist in Esperanto. The "f" sound is always written "f".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ouranikos

That's the point of the Esperanto orthography. The goal of both the grammar and the orthography is to be completely regular.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fricking.frack

It freaks me out whenever I see "Adamo" because that's my name and my name is never in these lessons


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

Adam and Sophia were the names of 2 of Zamenhof's children.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Haytham172317

My name is Haytham. It is written in Arabic هيثم with short vowels plus since there is no /θ/ in Esperanto, do I maintain how I write it in English or is there is a different approach? Worth mentioning that I speak Egyptian Arabic and /θ/ is pronounced /s/ -like Brazilian Portuguese- so could it be replaced?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

There are also sounds in Arabic that do not exist in English, so they are rendered as the next closest thing.

You can't spell it as "Haytham" in Esperanto because the T and the H would be pronounced separately as T and H, and there is no Y in Esperanto, so that would just be a foreign word.

The best rendering of your name in Esperanto would be Hesam or Hasam, depending on how you pronounce the first syllable.


https://omniglot.com/images/writing/esperanto.gif


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1045

Rae.F is correct. There's no true equivalent in Esperanto for that consonant, you can only choose from "t" or "s". In Japanese, θ becomes "s" too, like "thank you" becomes "sankyuu" (サンキュー). So "s" is probably the closer one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

Although in (for example) Irish accents, the /θ/ sound becomes a /t/ sound. I suggested "s" based on how he said he actually pronounces his name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1045

I think you can use Hajsam, Hejsam, Hajtam, or Hejtam. But if you want to stay as close to the original pronunciation as possible, I'd say Hajsam or Hejsam, depending on how you pronounce your name.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

He said it was all short vowels, which is why I suggested Hesam or Hasam.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AVAX3M
  • 1045

What do short vowels mean? I looked up the original Arabic name and found out that it's pronounced natively like "hi Thom" or "hey Thom", which means the first syllable has a diphthong. Do the short vowels mean that their name is pronounced without the diphthong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

That's right. Short vowels are pronounced for one beat and long vowels are pronounced for two beats. In some languages, some vowels become diphthongs when they lengthen and in some languages they don't.

The long "a" in English is the diphthong /eɪ/. In languages where it does not become a diphthong, it's just /e:/.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/medaght

Is ‘isto’ the ending for a language speaker? Like, ‘Mi estas anglicto.’ means I am an English speaker? Or does it only imply for Esperanto?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2443

-ist-: Professional; enthusiastic amateur; adherent, partisan; habitual doer:

  • ŝtelisto -- thief
  • motorciklisto -- motorcyclist
  • komunisto -- communist

http://www.romaniczo.com/esperanto/gramatiko/grammar_13.html

It's like the English suffix -ist.

http://esperanto.davidgsimpson.com/eo-affixes.html

IST = "a person who is often occupied with something (possibly professionally)". The part of the word coming before IST is always the topic that occupies the person.
There is often a misconception that IST equals a "professional", but its true meaning is much broader:

https://lernu.net/en/gramatiko/sufiksoj

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