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  5. "Ĉu la ĉambro estas varmeta a…

"Ĉu la ĉambro estas varmeta varma?"

Translation:Is the room lukewarm or warm?

June 4, 2015

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/truelefty

Varmeta = a bit warm
Varma = warm
Varmega = Hot

"Varmeta" is a bit weird....

June 4, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jumpthewalls

I love varmeta so much more than lukewarm as a word, like, varmeta gets the point across in a way that lukewarm just doesn't


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/senesperulo

I don't know of anyone who would refer to a room's temperature as lukewarm. Liquids and foods, yes. But never a room.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdwardThor2

Right, exactly. I used lukewarm, knowing it was non-English, because I had to guess what the Duolingo lesson would accept.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IAmCalumBlack

"Is the room warm or hot?" is also accepted. Definitely more normal sounding to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rapn21

I'm pretty sure most textbooks say that varma is warm.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Duolingo also accepts "Is the room warm or hot?" https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/varma#Esperanto

I really can't imagine asking if a room is lukewarm.

Yet: https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/varmega https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/varmeta#Esperanto


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antimatzist

I think it depends on the speaker. From what I've read, central European speakers will use varma as "warm" whereas in the English community, it means "hot".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tomicxo

I tend to treat it as if it meant warm, but spoken by an Australian from an Australian point of view (read: hot).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

I think you're making this up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominicSal294966

Duolingo is very inconsistent with whether it translates varma as warm or hot...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kliphph

chamber is not an acceptable synonym for ĉambro?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaLowenstein

I suppose it might have been in Jane Austen's time, but it's not normal usage any more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mico12345

tepid, slightly warm, warmish, at room temperature


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/solumaenus

Why doesn't "mild" work instead of "lukewarm"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaLowenstein

I'd say the temperature is mild, but not the room.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DidierLois

Reminds me of the French movie “Asterix mission Cléopâtre”, speaking about the bath:

Attention, c'est très très tiède

which could be translated as

Atento, ĝi estas tre tre varmeta


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cleanthe3

I remember, pretty funny :))


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donaldo_zouras

I always struggle with understanding the variations around "varma".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mico12345

I think it might be a individual thing. One's hot is another's warm. I think this may be like when is dinner or supper, which varies per person.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnnaLowenstein

Just don't worry about it! Don't try and give each word a precise English equivalent. Just accept the pair varma/malvarma (hot/cold). -eg- is an intensifier, while -et- diminishes the intensity. That's all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mark6662

lukewarm is what I generally relate to as the temperature of a liquid.

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