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  5. "Klærne dine havnet på gulvet…

"Klærne dine havnet gulvet."

Translation:Your clothes ended up on the floor.

June 4, 2015

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleksandra950388

Yesterday you told me 'bout the blue blue sky


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KosztolanyiG

Men alt jeg kan se er bare et gult sitrontree


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/karola_w

very useful phrase, takk ;) ;) ;) ;) ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flurin.arner

Hahahah "å havne" what a hilarious verb! Really got me laughing, because I wasn't thinking of "landing" like a ship!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

that is indeed the etymology


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langjd

My, what a sensual sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaleighStarbuck

So...just to confirm, the infinitive of the verb in this sentence is "å havne," yes? And can it be used to describe the fate of a person or the result of a situation as well? For example: "My brother ended up becoming a doctor"= "Broren min havnet å bli lege"? "Our meeting ended up being very productive"= "Møtet vårt havnet å være veldig produktiv"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zalkogas
  • I didn't get that drunk last night.
  • Dude, klærne dine havnet på gulvet!

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ellenspeaking

Is there a more elegant translation than "ended up"? Havnet is such a nice word, like haven, there must be a less slangy English equivalent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

You can say "landed" in English as well, but this is not as common as it is in Norwegian. And the idea in the Norwegian sentence is indeed more like "ended up", namely that this uis the "final position", You can't preserve both the metaphor and the intended meaning at the same time.

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