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https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk

Are the Spanish Idioms Really Spanish Idioms.

WanderingMonk
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In the Idioms and Proverbs skill, they all seem to be phrases we use in English and the Spanish translation usually doesn't have the same ring to it. For instance "Let bygones be bygones" "Borrón y cuenta nueva". "Or like father like son" I don't remember the translation but it wasn't as catchy. Are they something Spanish speakers use? Are they worth learning or are they a waste of time?

I know spanish speakers have there own idioms, I found some when I was trying to find out why Duolingo says "Católico" can mean "be a bit off", (I still haven't figured that one out but I found "no estar muy católico" "to be under the weather") I just want to know if they use the ones Duolingo teaches as well or if I would just get blank stares.

Some interesting ones I found were "Él no tiene pelos en la lengua" "He doesn't have hairs on his tongue" for "he tells it like it is." Or “Estar hecho un ají” for he's mad and "Echar agua al mar", “Ellos tienen un humor de perros", “Estar más sano que una pera”, “Empezar la casa por el tejado”

3 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/___Alejandro
___Alejandro
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As a native Spanish speaker, I can assure you that: "de tal palo, tal astilla" (like father, like son) is a very common idiom.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk
WanderingMonk
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Thanks, that's what I want to know. I wish I would have copied them all but I didn't think about it until I had finished the skill and realized that they all sounded like English language idioms, like "all that glitters is not gold." Maybe next time I go through it. I just want them to be universal if I'm going to learn them.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk
WanderingMonk
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Here's some more I dug up...

Soy la leche - I am the milk or I am so cool, I am the bees knees

Tragar sapos- To swallow toads or To go through a hard time

No hay que confundir la gimnasia con la magnesia- You mustn't confuse gymnastics and magnesium or let's not confuse matters

se le va la fuerza por la boca- his strength goes out through his mouth or He's all talk and no action. All hat and no cattle as they say in Texas.

pelar la pava- to peel the turkey or to chat someone up, to whisper sweet nothings lol

despedirse a la francesa- to say goodbye the French way or to leave without saying goodbye. ouch

Ser como guitarra en un entierro- To be like a guitar at a funeral or stick out like a sore thumb

Ahogarse en un vaso de agua- To drown in a glass of water or make a mountain out of a molehill

Las mentiras tienen patas cortas- lies have short legs

Donde el diablo perdió el poncho- where the devil lost his poncho or in a God-forsaken spot

No hay que buscarle cinco patas al gato- no need to look for five paws on a cat or no need to split hairs

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paradoja
paradoja
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As a native Spanish speaker, I am familiar with most of these, so yes, they are actual Spanish idioms.

It also happens (as in many other languages, I guess) that idioms can also vary, sometimes a lot, between different regions, but most of these can be probably understood by most Spanish speakers.

I'll only add one, because I found the "ouch" funny after "despedirse a la francesa":

  • hacerse el sueco (to pose as a Swedish) - to play dumb, pretend not to know or not to see something or someone
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk
WanderingMonk
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Thank you for your answer! That one is funny, it will certainly go on my list.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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Thanks for posting all these! I studied Spanish a long time ago and never got to have enough with these. I'd see a few here and there, but never had the chance to use them. And there are just SOOOO many! :) This is very fun though!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk
WanderingMonk
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You're welcome. I love idioms, I could look them up all day. Im going to make sure to memorize these. I learned an English one last year and used it all winter when someone would ask if I was warm enough- "I'm cozy as cornbread in the oven." :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnel1
tnel1
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:D I like that one! That's cute!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk
WanderingMonk
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¡Vete a freír espárragos! for go away lol.

Voy a consultarlo con la almohada. -sleep on it ha!

Él está como una cabra- for he's nuts! brilliant

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreedomWind

I really became aware of idioms when I took Translation University Courses (French-English). I had to really grasp their meaning in the source language to be able to translate those idioms with the equivalent in the target language. And, depending on where you come from, the idioms change. As an example, French is spoken in various countries in America, Europe and Africa. Some idioms are the same for all regions where other idioms change depending on the country. I have binders full of idioms in French and English. When you ask if the Spanish idioms are really Spanish Idioms, I would answer that they most likely are... and they may vary from Spain, Argentina, Mexico and so forth. Enjoy your search for idioms. Have a great day

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk
WanderingMonk
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Thank you very much for your answer and insights. You have a great day as well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SuperDescartes

Spanish actually has some idioms that are really similar to the English ones as I foudn out on duo, here is one that is bascially the same:

''a caballo regalado no se le miran los dientes''

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk
WanderingMonk
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Yes, I was wondering if the ones Duolingo teaches would actually be recognized by native Spanish speakers and it appear as though they would.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth261736

Thanks for asking this question. I bought both the French and Spanish idioms, but only tried the French idiom lesson so far and ended up quitting out of that. The French had idioms for "i have a hangover" every Sunday, which is not something that would be useful for me personally. According to the comments, it was an expression that was very old and might have been used by grandparents. I will try the Spanish idiom lesson at some point as that sounds better.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WanderingMonk
WanderingMonk
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I waited until I had finished my tree before I bought the idiom skill because I thought they would be different but it turns out they were all common in english or they a translation that had the same meaning as the english version but used completely different words so you'd have to memorize it instead of translate it word for word. Like "Consejos vendo y para mi no tengo" for "do as I say not as I do. That's why I was wondering if they were real spanish idioms or not.

Most of the idioms I posted in this discussion, in my other posts I got off the internet somewhere and not from Duolingo. I was just posting them because I thought they were so fun.

3 years ago

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