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"Mi preferas paperon ol plaston."

Translation:I prefer paper to plastic.

3 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ActualGoat

Well, make sure to use the paper sparingly. It doesn't grow on trees...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Would this be a case when ol can mean "over." As in "I prefer paper over plastic"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MailmanSpy

Yes, I typed that in and it worked for me.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fingtam
Fingtam
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Why is it plaston? I thought you don't use the accusative case after prepositions.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MailmanSpy

"Ol" isn't a preposition; it's a conjunction, just as English "than" is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fingtam
Fingtam
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Okay, thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/imtonie

"i prefer paper than plastic" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliGhozali
AliGhozali
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I wonder why we can'g use indefinite article "a" in the translation here I answered "I prefer.a paper rather than a plastic"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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Because "paper" and "plastic" are general terms, not specific. They're classes of things.

You might say "I prefer dinosaurs to birds," but "I prefer an oviraptor to a robin." You prefer an unspecified individual oviraptor to an unspecified individual robin. Though you can still make those into classes by adding an s: "I prefer oviraptors to robins." You prefer oviraptors as a general class to robins as a general class.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chris__martin

Aren't things always both? A raptor is "a dinosaur". " "I prefer red wine" and "I prefer a red wine" both make sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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Yes, but only when you wind up with a noun that makes sense.

Maybe the real problem here is that "I prefer paper to plastic" really means "I prefer paper bags to plastic bags." The actual noun is just understood.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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A paper or a plastic what?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Xandaros
Xandaros
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I wonder in what context you would ever say this...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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I heard it all the time growing up (in the US in the 1970s and 80s). Supermarkets and grocery stores would give customers the choice of having their purchases loaded into either paper or plastic bags. Both had their advantages: plastic bags had handles, and were waterproof and reusable; while the paper ones were larger, stronger and biodegradable.

Nowadays, paper bags have all but died out; but as long as I live I'll never forget the eternal question, "Paper or plastic?" (In fact, I still say it sometimes; but as more of a joke, meaning, "Will you be paying by cash [paper money] or credit card [plastic money]?")

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kholden83

Cash is also plastic in several countries.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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True. In which case you might be offered the option, "Hard plastic or soft?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GabrielFah3

Can someone tell me what I prefer, paper or plastic? I'm not sure yet...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WayneHJ

I does seem something a "Usono" would say. I've lived in 3 other English speaking areas, Southern Africa, UK and Australia, and never heard it except in a very joking manner.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kholden83

Yeah, paper bags only ever seem to be an option at pharmacies, and even then only if your purchases are small. (Australian, have lived in Canberra and country NSW.) Or at the grog shop, but I think that's about the required covering of the bottles, not customer convenience.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baloug
Baloug
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Can you use ol with malsama? A bit like in the common (although nonstandard) American English use of "than" with "different"?

Paper is different than plastic = Papero estas malsama ol plasto ?

2 years ago