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  5. "Li portas pantalonon."

"Li portas pantalonon."

Translation:He wears pants.

June 5, 2015

28 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gameboy86

Bona por li.

September 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

"Bone por li"

May 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharmingTiger

...thus begins the revolutionary cartoon based on a fictional marine sponge...

February 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OliviaMaschinot

Well that's polite of him. Apparently men in Denmark don't wear clothes at all.

July 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kholden83

I should hope so. (unless he's wearing a kilt)

June 11, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anglea

Are these trousers or underpants?

June 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesB84

Trousers.

June 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WarriorCleberz

Pants, normal.

June 30, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Apr.il

Danku dio!

September 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Raztastic

Li portas lian virpantalonon.

November 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LisBohnert

He wear his (someone else's) man-pants?

I think you meant “Li portas sian virpantolonon”, “he wears his own man-pants”

October 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FluffyCat113

From what I understand "pantanolo" refers to the whole pair of pants as one, is this correct?

November 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

Yes - from the Tips and notes section: (available when using the web page!)

PANTALONO

Note that the word pantalono, which means "trousers" (UK) or "pants" (US), is singular in Esperanto. Thus pantalonoj refers to multiple pairs of trousers.

November 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amerikan-Pojk

And English they are allways plural Pant does make sense I'm wearing a pant

August 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoshLingo1800

Yep

November 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

How does one say "trouser leg" in Esperanto - "pantalonkruro"?

(example: Imagine having to explain that you fell, because you stumbled when you got your foot stuck in one of the trouser's legs.)

November 21, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salivanto

"krurumo" -- if you're feeling particularly silly, try "kruringo." :-)

May 11, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanguine_Dreamer

What is the base language for portas?

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

According to the Universala Vortaro: [Esperanto français, English, Deutsch, русский, polski.]

port' porter | pack, carry | tragen | носить | nosić.

According to English Wiktionary:

From Italian portare.

... and if you look up French porter, or Italian portare, both end up as originating from Latin portāre, present active infinitive of portō ‎(“bring, carry”) - so, I'd say

"It's from Latin portō".

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanguine_Dreamer

Dankon. This made me wonder what to carry is, which happens to be porti as well, so aside from context how can it be known that an article of clothing is being worn as apposed to being carried?

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phle70

In Swedish (my native language), "(att) bära" can mean

  • to carry; to lift and transport anywhere else
  • to wear; e.g. a piece of clothing or jewelery

among other things, and you understand from context which one it is.

It actually seems to correspond rather well with the Italian portare
(and when I looked it up, the Swedish word seems to be distantly related to what in English is called "burden", but that's just my speculations).

-

So, in short, I guess we should be able to say something along the lines of
"Li portas pupon, kaj lia pupo portas ĉemizon kaj pantalonon."
and we have no idea of whether the doll wears the shirt-and-trousers, or carries the shirt-and-trousers (while we, or at least I, can assume that he's just carrying the doll). ;-)

February 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Orabela12321

By using derrivatives of porti, you can be more specific. For example, 'surporti' only means 'to wear'. It literally means 'to carry on'.

August 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cornbread4036

I sure hope he does!

May 22, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cnano98

no más pantalones

September 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anth150

Thank you

November 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phaeluis

Why does the pants have no singular? This confuses me!

April 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oishlam

It sounds like he's saying "Ili", but with the first 'i' quickly. That threw me off...

April 20, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/inivican

I keep wanting to say pantalonoj

March 14, 2018
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