https://www.duolingo.com/batareikin

que se dieron cita

I understand what "que se dieron cita" means in general. = "who gathered", but still can not take it translated apart. Can someone break this apart into words? In English.

May 17, 2012

4 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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'darse cita' means 'to meet' or 'to make an appointment'. So, the 'se' is part of the verb and can't be omitted. You don't have to translate it separately.

May 17, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/jalcruces
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I totally understand why you want to break it down. I always do that because It makes it make sense so that you can understand sentence structure and word usage better. I have always done this and do it every time I translate. They way I interpret it - literally - brokendown, is "That/which they given appointment". So like an appointment of several people to gather. Those who gathered. Who gathered. But I wouldn't quote myself on that ;)

May 17, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/batareikin

Hey wataya, very good answer!!! Actually I did not know that it was not 'dar' but 'darse' involved here. It is different verb, but it conjugates the same way like 'dar'. Darse is reflexive verb ind its meaning fits better to the combination I was wondering about.

May 18, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
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@batareikin: It is quite common in Spanish that reflexive forms of verbs have a different meaning than the base form. E.g. ir/irse, hacer/hacerse, dar/darse, ...

May 18, 2012
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