"Так, у мене є піца."

Translation:Yes, I have pizza.

June 6, 2015

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeBalochard

Is there any reason why in the translation the definite article is needed? Could this translation not be interpreted as "Yes, I have pizza"?

June 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vinnfred

On top of this page I see: Translation: Yes, I have a pizza. So you say, we can use "pizza" even without article at all?

June 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeBalochard

Yes, although it depends on the context.....if you are referring to the fact that you specifically have one pizza, you would say "Yes, I have a pizza." On the other hand, if you are talking about pizza generally without regard to the number, you can drop the article. For example, you are walking in a store and see a sign for pizza. You ask an employee at the store if they have any pizza and they would reply, "Yes, we have pizza."

June 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myron1313

The article "a" would be used when referring to an entire pizza. If more than one, then "the" is used (I have the pizzas). When talking about something less than a whole one, the article is dropped. For example, "I have pizza on my plate."

OMG, I actually explained something to Vinnfred! ;)

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vinnfred

:D I know this stuff concerning chicken, fo example, but for some reason pizza wasn't this kind of a food in my head :D

June 12, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whateverrrr1234

U mene e pitsa translates literally to "to me is pizza." The way to say this idiomatically is "I have pizza." There is no definite article because the amount is not specified.

Myron1313- haha, I know how you feel!

August 19, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vityachu

I'm native on Russian and the two are very similar. I believe the system should accept "Yes, I have pizza" without the 'a', it makes sense that way, at least in Russian.

June 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/whateverrrr1234

I noticed this, too. It sounds very similar in Russian (u menya yest as opposed to u mene e) which is simply possessive and does not specify an amount.

Knowing some Russian is making this so much easier!!

August 19, 2015
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