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https://www.duolingo.com/CosmoKaiza

What I don't like with the Spanish tree is ...

CosmoKaiza
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The thing that bothers me the most with the Spanish tree is the enormous amount of lessons per skills. I think it is discouraging and it make me unmotivated.

For example I am at the skill : "Present 3" (10 lessons) and "V. inf. 1" (10 lessons) before I had "Past Tense" (10 lessons) and after I have to do "Ir. Future" (10 lessons). It is too much, 40 lessons for 4 skills is a lot to remember. I know tenses are important in any language, but why put them all in the same place ? + Why 10 lessons ? 5 -7 Lessons are enough.

Well, if any Spanish contributor sees this post, I want to say your course is awesome but please make it less "heavy", especially for a beginner.

3 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/pseudocreobotra

Well... This is a common thing for the old trees.

The ones that were created by volunteers using the incubator usually have less lessons per skill as well as better and more explanations^^ That's another problem with the Spanish tree... A lot of skills later on just lack explanations, even grammar lessons don't explain at all what's going on.

It would still great if these issues could be improved... But it's quite unlikely.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

I feel the opposite, really. They need to cover a lot of verbs by that point, and I don't know about you but I'm finding tenses difficult to retain - and from the discussions I've seen, I don't think I'm unusual in that. I feel like breaking it into a lot of lessons means no single lesson goes on forever or has more than a manageable bite-sized portion of new vocabulary or information in it. By having 10 lessons, they cover all the material with lots of opportunities to pause (and xp at more frequent intervals. If there were only 5-7 lessons, each lesson would have to be longer in order to both introduce new material and offer repetitions to help get them into the memory. It would be harder to find a point to stop at, and there would be fewer incentives (fewer I-finished-a-lesson successes and xp gains).

So...it's different for different people, I guess! I don't mean to say you shouldn't be frustrated, because your learning style is yours. Just wanted to offer a different perspective, for what it's worth.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

Lingot because I totally agree.

I definitely will say that when you get towards the end of the tree, those long units are so frustrating. It's good to have lots of practice with the complex concepts, but oh my god, when you're so close, it becomes quite a slog.

FWIW, the Spanish-to-English tree has shorter units.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

I will be interested in that, when I start doing the reverse tree in earnest. (I opened it, but didn't do more than a couple lessons, because I couldn't follow a lot of the commentary, which seemed like it would be the most valuable part a lot of the time. I did see enough to make me reflect all over again that my native language is insane and I feel a vague sense of apology - and not-so-vague admiration - toward all the people who have to learn it as a second language.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/superdaisy

make me reflect all over again that my native language is insane and I feel a vague sense of apology - and not-so-vague admiration

Yes, TOTALLY. English is not easy! I have no idea how non-native speakers learn it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
zerozeroone
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I don't think it's a matter of having fewer but longer lessons, but breaking the current skills (with 10 lessons) into two skills (each with 5 lessons). So the tree ends up with more skills but the same number of lessons.

This would allow other topics to be thrown in between...you could do Present 3 (one-half of the current set), then Countries or Pronouns or the such, then Present 4 (the other half of the current set.) It would provide better reinforcement having it broken up that way, as well as avoiding the 40 verb lessons in a row.

The bad thing would be having to vet the skills that you move in between to ensure that the verbs in use are the ones left in the earlier skill.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

True, that could work. Or you could just have a skill called 'Present 3, part 1' followed immediately by Present 3, part 2. That would add more positive reinforcement, since it would let you finish a thing and get 2 lingots sooner, but I feel like the present set-up does reasonably well at providing frequent small incentives already.

Unless you mean, to take a break in subject matter by having the next lesson be something that isn't verbs? But we don't have to complete all the lessons in a skill before pausing to do something else on the same horizontal line. I often do a couple lessons of new skills, do some strengthening exercises, go off and read a book, come back and do a few more lessons... They all get done, usually sooner rather than later.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
zerozeroone
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The problem is there's a cluster of four verb skills arranged in three lines (1-2-1) so you can't go to a new non-verb skill until you've done those 40 lessons.

An alternative would be to make that section 2-3-2 where you'd add a new non-verb skill on each line for some variation in material.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tolunayo
tolunayo
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I am actually on the opposite site. I really appreciate having skills having a lot of lessons. This might mean a lot of work to finish the tree but that will also mean your skills are better rounded.

For example, for vocabulary related skills you will be exposed to a lot more sentences for you to master the words in real context.

I actually felt that some of the skills towards the end did not have enough lessons. I really really would like if they expanded Subjunctive skill classes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rspreng

And others have complained, for two years now, that the lessons are too long. ;) If you need to slow down, do so, but some things one simply must, well, learn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CosmoKaiza
CosmoKaiza
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My idea is to either reduce the number of lesson or maybe not put that many skills with a lot of lessons in the same time. It's like having 3 exams of 3 different subjects in the same time.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnlvs2run

My impression is that some skills don't have enough lessons. Maybe six to nine lessons is a good range for them. However the skills vary more in difficulty than by the number of lessons. I've been able to test out of some skills with 10 lessons, faster than going through 1 or 2 lessons in some others.

3 years ago