"Ŝi bezonas varmajn vestaĵojn."

Translation:She needs warm clothes.

3 years ago

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/seveer
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In my opinion this should be varmigajn.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
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Depends, do the clothes actively warm her, or do they just insulate her native body heat from the elements?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

I suppose you're right, strictly speaking, but it seems a little pedantic!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Revilo_N
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Ne. Jen: http://vortaro.net/#varma (3) varma: "Konservanta la efikojn de la interna brulado k ŝirmanta kontraŭ ekstera vetero"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BintaFulani

I distinctly remember "varma" translated as hot in a previous lesson, and now it is warm. I am well aware that hot clothes would not make any sense though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

In English there is a three-part system: hot - warm - cold. In Esperanto (as in many other languages), there is a two-part system: varma - malvarma, so "varma" covers a wider field than in English. If you really want to insist on something being very hot, you say "varmega", or if it's only a little warm you can say "varmeta". But on the whole, people just say "varma". It works fine in practice. As you said, "hot clothes" wouldn't make any sense, so there's no risk of misunderstanding.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HWF10
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Like in Portuguese: quente (hot) - morno (warm) - frio (cold) - gelado (iced).

But we never say "roupas (clothes) mornas". We say "roupas quentes"...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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In English we can say "hot clothes", but then it has nothing to do with temperature at all. That just means the clothes make the person look "hot" as in "very attractive". I don't think the Esperanto word is used for this. "Warm clothes" means something totally different as those are clothes which have long sleeves or are made of a thicker fabric to keep you warm. When you say "roupas quentes", which do you mean?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seveer
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I don't think English is systematic in the way you describe. It certainly isn't tripartite. There is also "cool" and "lukewarm." But you are right to point out that there need not be strict equivalency between languages.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

Fair enough. The point I was trying to make, as you said, is that the terms are not exactly equivalent. I speak Esperanto at home all the time with my husband, and in practice I've never encountered a situation in which I was wondering whether "varma" meant warm or hot. If necessary you can add -et- or -eg-, but it's not always needed.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mtc6474
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This sentence is truly ambiguous. It has two meanings 1) She needs clothes that keep her warm or 2) She need cloths that have been warmed (maybe she is cold already). Learning a new language seems to foster looking afresh at your birth language.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AusPole
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I don't understand why people marked this down - I thought the same thing about its ambiguity. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salivanto
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I didn't vote it down, but it's only ambiguous to a robot. If a mom told her kid to wear a warm hat, no kid who wanted to live to see age 11 would put a sun bonnet in the microwave and put it on.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Meera_Stm

I've already read the comments and so I know it can also be "varmajn", but I do feel as if "varmetajn" should also count as correct

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

In fact that would sound to me extremely odd (varmetaj vestoj). The normal expression is "varmaj vestoj", so in practice people would be wondering why on earth the clothes should only be "varmetaj". I could maybe imagine someone using the expression in spring, when you needed clothes which were halfway between heavy winter clothes and light summer clothes, but only in this very limited context. This shows that you can't just assume that the word "varma" and its variations are the exact equivalent of specific English words, but you have to get used to using the word in itself without thinking of English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davgwynne

Could this be "hot" as in the clothes to wear to a nightclub?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaLowenstein

No. That would be "seksallogaj" (sexy) or something like that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VirgilSchmidt

If I say, "Mi estas varma", I am saying I am hot... not warm. I got this particular question right ONLY because on another question I translated the word varma as hot and got dinged.

The "report" item did not have an option related to my statement.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MettaandLove

Mi bezonas vin. Mi amas vin!

3 months ago
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