"bona, pli bona, la plej bona"

Translation:good, better, the best

3 years ago

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/inxdxm
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La bona, la malbona kaj la malbela.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NovemberQuinn

good, gooder, the goodest. ;P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ActualGoat

Good, more good, the most good :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zerozeroone
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Good, plusgood, doubleplusgood.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Plus
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Fun fact: Newspeak was meant to be a parody of Esperanto; Orwell originally learned of its existence from his socialist aunt, and thought the language itself was part of the socialist movement.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LucasSanto309765

Orwell himself was a socialist

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xigoi
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G, G+, G++

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isoprenoid

So "bona" means "good" as in "well". 'Virto' means "good" as in virtuous.

Source: lernu.net dictionary

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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Does it explicitly say you can't use "bona" to mean virtuously good?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1e7nx0WG
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bona can be used to mean virtuously good. An example is "bonaj infanoj gepatrojn feliĉigas" meaning "Good children make parents happy". This comes from http://vortaro.net/#bona.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Travis_
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aaaaand, paradigm shifted. Way to be a good teacher Duo :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaypeta

Neniam permesu estas ripozo . Ĝis via bono estas pli bona kaj via pli bona plej bona!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maspik

Does "la plej (bona)" require the "la" in all cases?

It sounds a little unnatural translated literally to english.

Can I say "Mia plej bona amiko" or do I need the "la"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kanguruo
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Mia plej bona amiko is correct

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GastonDorren
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According to this grammar, the 'la' is not compulsory, and nor is a possessive (mia, etc): http://goo.gl/GCjvEl

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobthedrummer

So what's the mechanical explanation for why pli changes to plej in that scenario?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/inxdxm
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Literally in English, "Bona, pli bona, la plej bona" means "Good, more good, the most good".

Pli = more

Plej = most

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jacobthedrummer

Thanks. Is there a rule for applying those suffixes -i and -ej? (Besides -j means plural)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/trielt
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They aren't suffixes. Not in this case.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulDeNice1
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"good, better, the very best" should be accepted as an answer!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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"The very best" would be more like "la tre plej bona"

"Plej bona" literally translates to "most good". It doesn't really have any meaning like "very best"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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"very" or "tre" are unnecessary.
"the best" is already "the most" good that it can be. If you put "tre" in Esperanto to emphasize this, than you could translate that to "tre" in English, or vice versa, as it is really an English thing to do - emphasizing by adding "very" even though it is unnecessary.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Argyle11

How about "good, more good, the most good" as an answer? Before you ask who would say that, it's the first answer that came to me.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1e7nx0WG
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It might be understandable, but it's not good English.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaherMahmoudd

good, more good and most good.... should be accepted

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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"more good" and "most good" are invalid English grammar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulDeNice1
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I was giving a general translation, it does not have to be "correct", as a lot of the "correct" answers in this course are literally correct, but would never be spoken by English speakers. True translation is an "art form", as English has so many words (that have similar meanings). There are many ways of translating. Word for Word, Thought for Thought, General Meaning, Make the translation sound good, Make the Translation (plus any nuances in the words / sentence). Look at how many translations there are of the Bible in English! (Of course a language course has to be much more "exact" in the literal translation from another language, but many of the "correct" translations in this course would not be used by an English speaking person!)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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You're correct, except, "the best" is far more common on its own than "the very best". "Very" is just a flavor word in that sentence, and is really unnecessary in the phrase, and definitely unnecessary in the course.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulDeNice1
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"Very best" gives "punch" to your normal conversation. Now for a language course, (not this one), they always make the conversations for the learning of a foreign language so boring. You go to the shops, the post office, the train station, the restaurant, which is all really only necessary for a tourist course in language. I would love to see more "natural" conversations introduced in many more language courses - even this one!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackBond
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EDIT: Wow! I completely forgot what course we were talking about and went on about German! My mistake!

Right, the "punch" is just flavoring. And I don't know about adding more natural conversations, because natural conversations can mislead you about proper grammar. If you learn how to talk to someone casually at the shop or post office, how will you be prepared to speak formally to a job interviewer? I think it's better that beginner courses like these stick with the "tourist" style lessons so that we can get the proper language, that may sound stilted, but natives (I mean long-time speakers) will understand, and then we can save the more natural learning for more advanced courses and immersion.

But the immersion can be done alongside the Duolingo lessons. I do it via looking up German (I mean Esperanto) media. I learn a lot about casual conversations.

2 years ago
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