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  5. "Kvinnen spiser kyllingen og …

"Kvinnen spiser kyllingen og risen."

Translation:The woman eats the chicken and the rice.

June 7, 2015

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sean_Roy

But if you wanted to say, "The woman is eating chicken and rice" (which would seem to be much more common, at least in English), you would say, "Kvinnen spiser kylling og ris," right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusannaG1

Perhaps the woman is eating chicken with a side of rice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sschmoller

Why does the "n" at the end of "kvinnen" not sound, when it does at the end of "kyllingen" and "risen"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig

It does make a sound, you should be hearing 'kvinn'n'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sschmoller

Aha - maybe it's an "ear" thing. The trouble is that I hear "gen" at the end of "kyllingen" and "sen" at the end of "risen", but no "nen" at the end of "kvinnen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/smolxp

But why does it differ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fveldig

It doesn't differ? All masculine nouns have the n sound at the end in their definite form.


[deactivated user]

    The sound might differ a little, because the "e" in "nen" is kinda "swallowed".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/na-prablenia

    Shouldn't it be kyllingjøtten?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HoPonderev

    Why is “kvinna“ not accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryMcKeow2

    From what I have seen you have to type the variant spoken, even if it's not the variant you would use.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoryMcKeow2

    The program is marking "risen" as complete/correct long before I have said the word.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Reinier260524

    The translations are very literal and do not take into account the substantial difference in particle use in the two languages. Many translations sound very un-English, but I stick to them not to lose my duolingo points.

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