https://www.duolingo.com/wazari972

Eine Ente ist ein Vogel.

Vogel is supposed to be masculine, why isn't it "... ist einEN Vogel" ? isn't it accusative declension, or did I missed something ?

May 17, 2012

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Talat

It is still in the nominative. A duck is a bird. It is just an equality. The bird is not the recipient of any action.

May 17, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/Onur

As Talat said, the verb "sein" answers questions "Wer?" or "Was?", thus takes nominativ object not an accusative one.

May 17, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/Crataegus

In many languages, a certain class of verbs called either copulae (singular: copula) or linking verbs don't take a subject and an object (a do-er and a do-ee, i.e. 'He{subject} hit her{object}'). Instead, they take what's called a nominal predicate or a subject compliment. Instead of being the recipient of an action, it completes the information about the do-er. Take the example you gave: Eine Ente ist ein Vogel. 'Eine Ente' can't stand alone as a sentence, because there's no verb. The copula 'ist' joins 'Eine Ente' to its compliment, 'ein Vogel'. You can think of it as being a case where the subject 'eine Ente' is on both sides of the verb, because both sides of the verb are the same in some way.

June 1, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/lisa4duolingo

Crataegus provides some good information, but when referring to the "adjective, noun, or pronoun that follows a linking verb" one should refer to it as a "subject complement," not a "subject compliment."

compliment

complement

For more on subject complements, see the following:

Subject complement

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/misspog

Have a look at the "My mother is an architect" example

http://german.about.com/library/blcase_nom.htm

May 20, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/diN0bot

I once heard someone talk about verbs that always took nominative case on either side, eg sein and heißen. There is a name for these kinds of verbs---does someone know it? I'd like to find out more about these verbs, such as what other German verbs are like this, and if the always that I said above is true.

May 21, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/VanX-IInX

Linking verb

December 12, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/jonwizard

Imagine sein to be an equals sign. "A duck is a bird" becomes "A duck = a bird." With sein ( = ), both things on each side of the verb equal each other, so since you use nominative one one side, you must use nominative on the other. Also, I believe it's called a reflexive verb, @diN0bot.

June 19, 2012

https://www.duolingo.com/Yff

It is a predicate nominative case: http://duolingo.com/#/skill/de/Nominative-Case

April 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/elron

Nouns on the left and right of "be" verbs are nominative. This is true in English as well.

January 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AmirGorji

Maybe it has no problem :-!?

May 7, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/IHZ

I think your comment would apply if ussing "isst". But with "is eating" the phrase doesn't have sense. :)

September 5, 2013
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