"Ni portas kvar sakojn kaj unu keston."

Translation:We carry four bags and one chest.

June 7, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belridetulo

what is the difference between skatolo and kesto?

June 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Francisco.Marco

'skatolo' is a box (exemple where you put a pair of shoes). A 'kesto' es bigger, is a coffer or a drawer

June 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siavel

Kesto can also be a chest.

August 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariolis101

lmao, skatolo...... the word σκατό in greek ( my native language) , pronounced skato , literaly translates to ❤❤❤❤!!!!!!!!!!

April 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChuckBaggett

What's difference in English between bag and sack? (as containers, not bag as capture and sack as in getting fired)

December 23, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sdtrask1

I tried "sack" just to see, and it was accepted.

July 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2010

I think "bag" is more common in American English and "sack" is more common in British English. As far as I can tell they're pretty much synonymous, although as an American I would need a Brit to fill in the details.

December 28, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/n2fole00

In British English women have (hand) bags. In the supermarket there are plastic bags. In the home, bin bags.

Sacks are usually cloth or hemp and are big enough to throw a child into. Think of the sack race.

January 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2010

Dankon!

January 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PolMicheal

It's the same here (en Usono).

June 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamKunin

I think one could say you wear a bag

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2010

Saying "wear a bag" carries the meaning that the bag is being used as clothing.

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamKunin

Oh and you can't wear a chest. Dankon

February 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidBock9

Probably you would say 'carry a bag', but 'wear an article of clothing' .

May 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2010

Only clothing can be worn, but both clothing and other items can be carried.

May 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidBock9

So if you say: 'Li portas la ĉapelon.' how do you know whether he is wearing or carrying the hat?

May 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2010

Context, I would imagine. It's the same situation in French, which is where I believe Zamenhof got this word from. "Porter" means "to carry/to wear".

May 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidBock9

Thanks. Not just French! The same thing happens in German with the verb 'tragen' which can also mean either 'wear' or 'carry' depending on context.

May 25, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Samuelhoupt

so in this case is chest referring to a suitcase?

January 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2010

No, "suitcase" is "valizo". A chest is more like a trunk.

January 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinBroderick

Wasn't portas used for wear earlier? Dores it mean both wear and carry?

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2010

Yes, porti means both "to carry" and "to wear", just like porter does in French, where Zamenhof got the word from.

January 24, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EsperantoHundo

So is this also a suitable translation? (in the sense of "to carry"). Ni portas kvar sakojn kaj unu keston

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2010

Given that's how it's being taught, I would presume so, yes.

June 29, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Indarozino

Kiun vi intencas priŝtelos?

May 6, 2017
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