"Mannen setter seg ned i stolen."

Translation:The man sits down in the chair.

June 9, 2015

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/snigrig

you guys can check this link to understand the differences between sitter and setter, legger and ligger! http://norskstudy.blogspot.com.tr/2015/08/different-between-sittersetter-and.html

July 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/qisforben

Wow, great link. I get it, now.

October 12, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cezarribeiro

Tusen Takk, sebnemgirgin!!! Really very helpful!

November 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Ingenoone

As my peers have said before: Fantastic link, sebnemgirgin! Thank you very very much for sharing! There you have some lingots!

January 30, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Jess.Schoolcraft

Thank you so much for this. I understand it now!

April 7, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MladenBrankovic

Tusen takk!

May 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/alan.schmi3

If we already have "sitter", what's the point of this use of "setter"?

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991

"Sitter" does not take a direct object. "Setter" does. One "is sitting" passively, in Norwegian, and one "sets oneself down" actively.

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/alan.schmi3

So if I understand correctly, "setter" would not translate to "sitting" in any situation, whereas "sitter" would translate ONLY to "sitting"?

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991

Yes. When there's a direct object, use "sette." When there isn't, use "sitte."

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/alan.schmi3

Jeg tenker jeg forstår (apologies if I misused those two words). Thank you for clarifying!

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991

No worries!

June 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Pietro.Simone

so can I say: kan jeg sitte her? and Kan jeg sette på stolen?

September 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Wiltrud3

Jeg kan si: kan jeg sitte her? men det heter: kan jeg sette meg på stolen?

January 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/forkMe

So in this case "setter" takes an object "seg", which is himself, in this situation?

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Luke_5.1991

Exactly.

March 21, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/beekgeek

Is Norwegian "stolen" ever translated to English "the stool", or is an English stool only translated as "krakken"?

October 31, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

The latter.

November 2, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerSingh

do you need to use ned? Can it be "Mannen setter seg i stolen?"

August 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

Since Norwegian uses separate verbs for sitting and sitting down, you can omit "ned" without losing the meaning.

November 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Regney
Mod
  • 1871

Hi, There's no option to report, My answer should be accepted on this one, so here goes:
The man is seating himself on the chair.
Tusen takk!

The suggested translation provided was, "The man is setting himself on the chair." I can't speak for every English speaker out there, but that sounds, to me, like he's outside himself and placing his corporeal body onto the chair, like a dust cover or something. :0)

Seat as a verb, please see here or here

April 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/cezarribeiro

I thought so.. ich dachte so, men takk! : ) Btw, if i may ask you, Deliciae - hvordan si jeg: i thought so/ich dachte so eller i think so/ich denke so og thank you in advance.../danke im Voraus für... på norsk? tusen takk im Voraus X)

November 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

Bare hyggelig!

If you're using it on its own, like above, then "Det var det jeg trodde" (That's what I thought).

December 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cezarribeiro

Oh, mange takk! Jeg vil huske det nå!

December 14, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexValver5

Could I say "på stolen" instead of "i stolen"?

January 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

Yes, if you were referring to a less comfy type of chair.

Both languages make a distinction between sitting on dining chairs and the like, but in comfy recliners and similar.

April 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cezarribeiro

Ohh very interesting insight, as always - years and years already living the English language and never noticed there was an actual difference between the two!! : D

November 27, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

Hehe, I probably wouldn't have given it much thought either, if I didn't have to explain it. :)

November 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/cezarribeiro

Heheh, exactly right?! : ) Never had to explain it to anyone myself, so... hahahah Nah.. im just stupid, i know. X)

November 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Gilligan94

Are there rules for knowing when to pronounce the suffixes such as "en" on the end of "stolen"? In the audio for this sentence, I don't hear it...

December 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

It depends on dialect, how fast the word is said, and whether it's a formal occasion which calls for more proper enunciation, but the "e" in "-en" usually ranges from faint to inaudible.

Similarly, the "t" in "-et" will usually be silent.

The "a" in the definite feminine ending "-a" should be pronounced.

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Gilligan94

Takk!

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

Bare hyggelig!

August 3, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/e-lt
  • 626

how do i know when to use ned and not nede?

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

You use "ned" with verbs indicating movement, and "nede" for static location. So it's "ned" for the process of getting seated, and "nede" to describe where you are seated.

This same pattern holds true for quite a few other adverb pairs like "opp/oppe" and "bort/borte", and a neat way I've seen for remembering which is which, is to imagine that the last "e" is so loosely fastened to the rest of the word, that it falls off whenever it starts moving.

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/e-lt
  • 626

got it!!tusen takk

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

Bare hyggelig! :)

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertAGun1

Although "to sit" is most frequently an intransitive verb, in Western Canada, it is also a transitive verb -- used in colloquial speech. It is very common to hear, "Sit yourself down!" whereas "Set yourself down", is virtually unheard. Because "ned" need not be translated into English for the essence of the message to be conveyed, the translation that would, to most people sound both usual and correct is, 'The man is sitting himself in (or into) the chair."

Almost invariably, Western Canadians, use "sit" in reference to an action taken by a person (or an animal) affecting himself/ herself/ itself and not in respect to an action affecting another person or thing whereas they use "set" in reference to an action that an individual (or an animal) takes in respect to someone or something else. Example, "He set the plates on the table."

May 1, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sean_Roy

It sounds like the 'r' in setter and the 's' in set combine to make the 'sh' sound, like in "norsk." Is that true? Can they do that? Or is it just an issue with the audio?

April 5, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

Yes, they can combine across words, especially in hurried speech.

April 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/loladesu

The English pick-the-words translation is grammatically incorrect. It offers only "in" not "on". To sit "in the chair" is rarely used in modern English, and would only be used for, say, an armchair (something you can sink into).

August 31, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/bbea21

Why is here the pronunciation of "seg" different? It sounds like the "sh" sound in english (e.g. "SHe"), but in previous lessons it was "s" like "See"

December 28, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ycUvuSap

The previous word ends in "r", which causes the sounds to combine.

January 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/donniecalico

What is the purpose of "seg" here?

September 16, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/JulsEDT

the man sits HIMSELF down in the chair.

November 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/LukeMaydwell

could you leave out seg and still have a grammatically correct sentence? Or would a native speaker still understand you?

November 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/NorskStudent

"Å sette" takes a direct object (while "å sitte" does not) so i believe you would need "seg" (or another object) for the sentence to be grammatically correct.

March 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Leif370552

At first this was very confusing, but I understand it much better now.

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

That's great! And a good thing to remember the next time you run into a confusing concept. :)

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/orgamsme

Why can't the "stolen" be stool? Why is it always "chair" ?

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Mod
  • 159

"A stool" would be "en krakk", so close - but no cigar.

July 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/orgamsme

Thank you!

August 6, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/radmila937697

One cannot "sit in" the chair. Normal people sit on chairs but norwegians have their magic :d

November 29, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/silverthornfire

You can sit in a chair if you have a big comfortable armchair for example.

February 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/Wiltrud3

What has the magic :d to do with to sit in or to sit on a chair?

January 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/alantrousers

You can indeed sit in chairs. As silverthornfire says, it implies a certain type of chair, with armrests.

August 6, 2016
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