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"Sí, tengo un perro pequeño."

Translation:Yes, I have a small dog.

4 years ago

81 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Samsta
Samsta
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Remember you can say "perrito" which is like "doggy" and also implies that it is small. But don't use it on Duo, he won't like it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gnorian

I notice, "tengo un" seems to combine into "tengun" when spoken?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dwarven_hydra
dwarven_hydra
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This is actually something that happens in spoken Spanish. If a word ending in a vowel precedes a word beginning with a vowel, they tend to be said together as if it was a single vowel. I believe the official term for this is "elision".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gnorian

Elision, huh? Thank you! I'll try to learn the elisions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleWing1

@ dwarven_hydra - re: "elision"

¡Muchas gracias! http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elision

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JT_____11
JT_____11
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thanks so much:D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmilianoZazueta
EmilianoZazueta
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Yes, but don't worry if you say it separately. I'm from México and if you say "Tengo_un_perrito" still perfectly fine and even more clear.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Grytr
Grytr
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Be careful. I translated this sentence in a "Type what you hear" section. I heard: "Sí, tengo un pero pequeño". I translate that to "Yes, I have a small but[t]"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiraDehnel

The r is rolled. Hard to tell sometimes.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hs29590

Does the order matter? "Perro pequeño" or "pequeño perro" ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleWing1

@ hs29590 - re: Does the order matter? "Perro pequeño" or "pequeño perro"?

Hola hs29590. I have to disagree with neiht20's reply. I think the order is curcial in this sentence.

I'm currently reading the section on adjectives in "Spanish Grammar for Dummies".

There are a bunch of rules regarding the order of nouns and adjectives. However, here's what I can make of the rules;

Some adjectives are homonyms like "antiguo" which means "former" when it comes in front of the noun it modifies and means "ancient" when it comes after the noun it modifies. I don't think "pequeño" has a second meaning.

Some adjectives like "grande" change meaning from "large" to "great" and spelling from "grande" to "gran" when placed in front of a noun. The word "pequeño" doesn't do this either as far as I know.

And lastly, you can put an adjective in front of a noun if the adjective is already a self evident property of the noun, like in the case of "pegajoso jarabe" (literally 'sticky syrup') or it is a possessive adjective or a determiner.

However, "pequeño" does add new information about the "perro" and is not a possessive or determiner so according to Spanish syntactic grammar, must come after the noun it is adding the new information to.

In fact "Spanish Grammar for Dummies" went on to say that if you had more than one adjective, then you would put the one you want to emphasize the most at the end of the list of adjectives.

So, if I was in doubt about whether I could put an adjective in front of a noun without changing the meaning and/or spelling, then I would be it after the noun.

But maybe there's some exception to "pequeño" that I don't know. I'm just studying Spanish for fun so a real native speaker would know better then me.

For the time being though I would stick to putting it after. That just the best I can figure from other stuff I read.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benjamin924

@ hs29590 - re: Does the order matter? "Perro pequeño" or "pequeño perro"?

Hola hs29590. I have to disagree with neiht20's reply. I think the order is curcial in this sentence.

I'm currently reading the section on adjectives in "Spanish Grammar for Dummies".

There are a bunch of rules regarding the order of nouns and adjectives. However, here's what I can make of the rules;

Some adjectives are homonyms like "antiguo" which means "former" when it comes in front of the noun it modifies and means "ancient" when it comes after the noun it modifies. I don't think "pequeño" has a second meaning.

Some adjectives like "grande" change meaning from "large" to "great" and spelling from "grande" to "gran" when placed in front of a noun. The word "pequeño" doesn't do this either as far as I know.

And lastly, you can put an adjective in front of a noun if the adjective is already a self evident property of the noun, like in the case of "pegajoso jarabe" (literally 'sticky syrup') or it is a possessive adjective or a determiner.

However, "pequeño" does add new information about the "perro" and is not a possessive or determiner so according to Spanish syntactic grammar, must come after the noun it is adding the new information to.

In fact "Spanish Grammar for Dummies" went on to say that if you had more than one adjective, then you would put the one you want to emphasize the most at the end of the list of adjectives.

So, if I was in doubt about whether I could put an adjective in front of a noun without changing the meaning and/or spelling, then I would be it after the noun.

But maybe there's some exception to "pequeño" that I don't know. I'm just studying Spanish for fun so a real native speaker would know better then me.

For the time being though I would stick to putting it after. That just the best I can figure from other stuff I read.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tgcombo

Can you use poco in this context?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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No. "Poco" is little as in number/"a small amount", pequeño on the other hand, refers to "little" as in size. http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=little

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tgcombo

Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeKing2

So in spanish adjectives come at the end of the sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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Most of the time that is true, but sometimes adjectives can be moved for emphasis or to change their meaning. http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/whereadjective.htm http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/100027/adjective-placement#.U-K00cog_p0

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleWing1

@ GeorgeKing2 - re: So in Spanish, adjectives come at the end of the sentence.

Hola GeorgeKing2. I'm not trying to be a jerk or anything, but I don't think adjectives necessarily need to be placed at the end of the entire sentence.

There are several different types of adjectives (like counters, possessives and determiners) and still others adjectives that describe innate qualities of the noun that they modify (think 'sticky syrup').

These types of adjectives should be placed in front of the noun that they modify.

However, adjectives that add new information to the noun that they modify should probably be place right behind that noun.

If your sentence was fairly descriptive, then piling up the adjectives at the end of the sentence would probably lead to the lost of association to the specific nouns in the sentence that they modify. Here's an example in English that you can imagine in Spanish;

"The car and the victim were found behind the warehouse, torched murdered, abandoned."

Although Spanish is versatile when it come to the order of subject, object and indirect object phrases, I think something like the previous sentence would be syntactically wrong in Spanish grammar.

But again, (standard disclaimer here) I ain't no expert. This is just my feeling based on some stuff I recently read in "Spanish Grammar for Dummies". :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
MaggiePye
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Not at the end of the sentence, specifically, but after the noun they modify. (There are a few exceptions, but for the most part, adjectives follow the noun.)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Calimon

I wrote "sí, tengo perro pequeño" and was not given credit because I left out "un". I suppose, since she actually said it, I should have included, but I just want to confirm whether it is still grammatically correct to say without the "un".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleWing1

@ Calimon - re: ...just want to confirm whether it is still grammatically correct to say without the "un".

Hola Calimon. I see nobody answered this question yet. I tried to bump it up the list with an upvote ages ago. I was curious to read a response myself.

Well, I guess the question still stands.

"Si, tengo perro pequeño." (Yes, I have small dog.)

It should go without saying but, I'm no expert, but I do have an opinion. And here it is;

I think that the indefinite article "un" is acting at least like a counter for a noun that seems to need one in this sentence.

Without the "un" I feel like the small dog is like some kind of inanimate thing like meat.

Plus, doesn't Spanish have that personal "a" thing that gets used for pets?

I know she didn't say it in this exercise sentence, but without the "un", the "perro" no longer sounds like an animate entity.

It may be grammatical, but so taboo that it's never, ever said.

Any native speakers care to explain? I'd appreciate your feedback too. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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I agree with you. I've been dying to hear someone's input for this question. I wanted to mention though that yes while the personal "a" is commonly used for pets, the personal "a" is rarely used with "tener", though there are certain cases when you could use it. http://spanish.about.com/cs/grammar/a/personal_a.htm

I've been trying to think of explainations to this question for a while and I've come up with 2 possible explainations (though I could be completely wrong xD). "Tener" is generally followed by a noun without the indefinite article (un/una) when it is understood that people usually only possess one of it at a time. http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/indefinite.htm However, with pets, it's not known how many you have, because it's possible (and common) to own multiple pets, so the "un" is added in to clarify that the person only owns one dog (versus 2 or more dogs). The other explaination that I thought of was that it's possible that the person owns multiple dogs, however, maybe only one of the dogs is small, so the "un" is there to explain that one of his dogs is small, but the other 2 or 3 might be large dogs.

Anyway, those are my thoughts about it. I would love to see a natives explaination about this topic.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benjamin924

@ Calimon - re: ...just want to confirm whether it is still grammatically correct to say without the "un".

Hola Calimon. I see nobody answered this question yet. I tried to bump it up the list with an upvote ages ago. I was curious to read a response myself.

Well, I guess the question still stands.

"Si, tengo perro pequeño." (Yes, I have small dog.)

It should go without saying but, I'm no expert, but I do have an opinion. And here it is;

I think that the indefinite article "un" is acting at least like a counter for a noun that seems to need one in this sentence.

Without the "un" I feel like the small dog is like some kind of inanimate thing like meat.

Plus, doesn't Spanish have that personal "a" thing that gets used for pets?

I know she didn't say it in this exercise sentence, but without the "un", the "perro" no longer sounds like an animate entity.

It may be grammatical, but so taboo that it's never, ever said.

Any native speakers care to explain? I'd appreciate your feedback too. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benjamin924

@ Calimon - re: ...just want to confirm whether it is still grammatically correct to say without the "un".

Hola Calimon. I see nobody answered this question yet. I tried to bump it up the list with an upvote ages ago. I was curious to read a response myself.

Well, I guess the question still stands.

"Si, tengo perro pequeño." (Yes, I have small dog.)

It should go without saying but, I'm no expert, but I do have an opinion. And here it is;

I think that the indefinite article "un" is acting at least like a counter for a noun that seems to need one in this sentence.

Without the "un" I feel like the small dog is like some kind of inanimate thing like meat.

Plus, doesn't Spanish have that personal "a" thing that gets used for pets?

I know she didn't say it in this exercise sentence, but without the "un", the "perro" no longer sounds like an animate entity.

It may be grammatical, but so taboo that it's never, ever said.

Any native speakers care to explain? I'd appreciate your feedback too. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jenniferks20

I had the entire sentence correct except for 1 missing R in 'perro'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
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I'm sorry about that! I know that it is frustrating when you lost a heart for missing something small. However, it makes a difference with this sentence because "perro"=dog, "pero"=but. You wouldn't want to say "Yes, I have a small 'but'".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LittleWing1

@ jenniferks20 - re : perro/pero

Hola jenniferks20. Yeah. Been there. Done that.

But like neiht20 says duo will get you ever time for that one. Count those "r"s. It makes a lot of difference. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HannahBanana8204

How do you loose a heart? I've gotten plenty of things wrong but never lost any hearts.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FoxGirl321

Please note that these comments were posted 3 years ago. Duo has been updating and changing things since then.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/losdosporfavor

I said, "I have a tiny dog." Duo said it was wrong, but "tiny" and "little" are synonyms. I don't understand why they marked it wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

They are near synonyms, but mean different things. "Small" is a size that is smaller than a perceived norm or average. "Tiny" is usually considered smaller than small to the point of being VERY small, often with added connotations depending on the context.

Just as there is a distinction between "small" and "tiny" in English, there is a distinction between "pequeño" and "diminuto" (which I think is the word for "tiny"). I am a novice Spanish learner, though, so I may be wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liv948552

I used to have Un pequeno perro

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Princesscakeface

Big and huge mean the same thing but in diffrent words.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sainio
sainio
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"Huge" is more like "enorme" in Spanish: it's usually bigger than just "big."

2 years ago

[deactivated user]

    HA

    EditDelete1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LucyRowland95

    I wrote this as "Yes, I have a small dog". It said I was wrong and that the correct answer was "Yeah, I have a small dog". That doesn't make any sense to me as yes and yeah are surely the same word, and even so I used the more formal of the two.

    To make things weirder when I clicked to discuss the phrase it confirms on the discussion page that the correct answer is "Yes, I have a small dog", which I put!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
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    Are you 100% positive you didn't accidentally type "Yea" instead of "Yes" (since they're next to one another on the QWERTY keyboard)?

    I only ask this because every time I get this sentence, I type, "Yes, I have a small dog," and it is accepted, but someone in the comments found that "Yea" was not accepted, and was corrected to "Yeah."

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LucyRowland95

    I am about 99.9% as I checked over my answer again and again to make sure I wasn't going crazy. But there is always that 0.1% chance!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DaniloAustria
    DaniloAustria
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    same thing happened to me just now, I typed "yes, I have a small dog" was marked wrong and the correct solution is apparently "Yes, I have a small dog."

    A bit weird

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LucyRowland95

    I clicked the option to submit it as an answer than should be accepted, so if it is a mistake on duolingo's part then I'm sure it will be sorted soon :)

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Mehefin14

    I typed Yes, I have a small dog, and I was marked as incorrect, even though the correct solution also said Yes, I have a small dog. I stared in disbelief for a while comparing the two answers looking to see any difference, but believe me there were none!

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JettKleber

    "Yes, I have a tiny dog" came back as incorrect.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
    PERCE_NEIGE
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    Tiny is smaller than small?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JT_____11
    JT_____11
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    yea duo doesnt like perrito. i guess 'doggy' isnt correct english either

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Ben.gineer

    I wrote: If I have a small dog. When is si=yes and when is it "if"?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
    neiht20
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    sí (with the accent mark) = yes

    si (without the accent) = if

    accents are very important in written Spanish, be careful with them :)

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/planegilmour

    Can't one say, "tiny" for pequeño as well?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/kyra.rae

    why wont it let me use 'puppy' thats a small dog

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
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    Because a small dog is not necessarily a puppy. (And a puppy is not necessarily all that small, depending on breed. A Great Dane puppy is larger than many full-grown dogs. )

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EkiMonker

    I was wondering the same. I translated "Un gato pequino" into "a kitten" and that answer was accepted. Can someone clarify?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
    neiht20
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    I'm not sure why they accepted in the first place. A dog can be small without being a puppy. There are specific words in Spanish for those two words: puppy=cachorro, kitten=gatito.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Madridista.1

    So in spanish the adj comes after noun?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/corinanic

    Why doesn't it let you say tiny instead of small?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/bowlerae

    I have a question about pequeño vs pequeña. When I was in Mexico, people were asking if I spoke Spanish. I tried to tell them "a little" or "a little bit". I simply responded "pequeño". Many people were correcting me and saying "pequeña". Is it because I am a female that the feminine version would be use? Is there a better way to say "I speak a little Spanish"? I figure it would be "Hablo Español pequeño" or "Hablo pequeño Español".

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
    neiht20
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    http://www.spanishdict.com/answers/133311/how-do-you-say-i-speak-a-little-spanish

    "pequeño/a" usually refers to size (not amount) based on my understanding

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
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    Are you sure they weren't telling you "poquito"? Because "pequeño" means "small," not "a little."

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/elmatapayazos

    do you speak spanish ? , ..... yo hablo un poco or un poquito...... ; pequeño o pequeña..... INCORRECT ¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡¡.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianW782633

    You little pequeño

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/elmatapayazos

    the little house in the prairie = la casita en la pradera

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/SwaggDoge21

    i put "i have a tiny dog and i was incorrect"????

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ashishbnwl

    Someone please suggest me a book to learn spanish.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/karateduk

    yes i have a small dog, do you?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/annalovesgym

    Why did it let me do kitten but not puppy?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ximenavaldivia0

    yes the dog is small

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
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    That would be, "Sí, el perro es pequeño."

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/autic

    Yes, I have a small dog.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Jakharisandcroft

    It's not working

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/BlizardRaija

    That is what I wrote

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ca.sh

    How do you know when to put the adjective before or after the noun?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Yellowfang685

    Yes, I have a small dog, how did you know?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/nianders

    Sorry I am allergic to dogs

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/da_kingofspanish

    no i have 2 cats actually

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/RSvanKeure

    And the famous quote: "...And your little dog, too!"

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/K1MJONGUNations

    ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) ripperooni

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/James946676

    That's unlucky bro but i wouldn't admit it here

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/KittyKattyCutie5

    Could you not say I have a puppy instead of I have a small dog?

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
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    They're not the same thing. A ten-year-old toy poodle is a small dog, but it's not a puppy. A six-month-old Saint Bernard is a puppy, but not a small dog.

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/KittyKattyCutie5

    ohh! that explains it well. Because puppy determines age not size, like the above mentioned Saint Bernard.

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/nianders

    find the word "dog" in this (hfudfghuefhhhhhdhfsdhshegyfshghsdogdjvbdbvxjbvxnvbvxnvbxnbvxnbvxmn

    11 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Brooke467149

    HEE HEE!

    10 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MegaForceXD

    why do this have to be confusing some of the time

    10 months ago