"Bonvolu doni la pomon al mi."

Translation:Please give me the apple.

June 10, 2015

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/isaac387423

Classic thing for Adam to say

February 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharmingTiger

Okay.

March 3, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Canvasian

Why is the infinitive used here?

June 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johmue

Because there is already a non-infinitive verb, the imperative "bonvolu".

June 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Canvasian

Ohhh, got it! Thanks

June 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/admhnsn

what would it mean if donas was used instead?

June 5, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thaddeus108

Now, if Rodrigo Borgia had said it like this, the game would have ended so much differently!

February 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BCWoogy

Wut?

May 26, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thaddeus108

It's an Assassin's Creed II joke.

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BCWoogy

Alright...

May 29, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thaddeus108

I don't like putting spoilers in public conversations, message me if you want an explanation. Lol

May 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nitishch

Note that the 'bonvolu' here is the imperative form of the verb 'bonvoli' meaning 'to do a favour'. That's why the verb 'doni' is in infinitive. So I guess it literally means 'Do me a favour by giving me the apple'.

September 20, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elsentrix

So if you didn't have bonvolu it would be donu la pomon al mi? is that correct using the command?

March 7, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edison88

Seems like it. Would be nice to have bonvolu broken down into its constituent parts to be able to know how it interacts with the following infinitive.

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Majklo_Blic

I'll give it a shot.

  • bon- = good.

  • voli = to wish or to want.

So bonvoli means to want what's good [for someone]. This is reinforced by the noun form, bonvolo, which means affection or goodwill.

Putting it together, "Bonvolu [verb]" should translate roughly as, "[I insist that] you want it to be good to [verb]." Which is a mouthful to say, but pretty much what we mean by, "Please."

(It's a slightly different perspective, though. To please is to make someone happy, while bonvoli is more about you being happy to do something.)

September 24, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Simarbir

Does "bonvolu doni min la pomon." mean the same? I'm confused. Could someone please explain.

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/admhnsn

"bonvolu doni al mi la pomon." you need the "al" not completely sure why and "mi" is not the object, it is the subject so does not need the n at the end of it

January 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisBrads8

Is it supposed to not accept "Please give me that apple."?

March 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Edison88

That would be "kion" rather than "la" I believe.

April 25, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danielqsc

That would be "tiun pomon".

March 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveAwesome

Don't do it, he's a templar!

May 15, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohanovanOosten

why is it mi instead of min?

October 30, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/confed00

guess 'hand me' won't work here haha

December 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElectricCoffee

Am I the only one who confuses pomon with tomato?

January 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErnaBuber-

I wish that Duolingo would accept 'incorrect' English: 'Please to give the apple to me' is a literal translation, and helps me 'see' the Esperanto construct.

July 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/viguidugli

I might be confused with any other grammar rule, but shouldn't we take the -n off when used after an arcticle? So, shouldn't it be "le pomo" instead of "la pomon"? (Doni la pomo al mi / doni pomon al mi)

August 16, 2017
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