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"Kunikloj ŝatas karotojn."

Translation:Rabbits like carrots.

3 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Alexander_Rais
Alexander_Rais
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Little fun fact: rabbits aren't actually keen of carrots and too many can be bad for them. You have Bugs Bunny to blame for that. The more you knooow

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eo5g
eo5g
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The voice actor for bugs Bunny was allergic to carrots, and had to spit them out after recording himself eating them.

So technically, they were bad for bugs too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Rumor has it that Mel Blanc tried to eat celery instead, but it just didn't provide the right sound.

No wonder he was always asking for a "Doc."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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And you have Clark Gable to blame for that. Turns out Bugs was impersonating his character in "It Happened One Night", a popular film from that era. It was an inside joke that caught on... kind of like Adamo and Sofia (Zamenhof's children) being the default names used in example sentences for this course.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pratyush.
Pratyush.
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Yeah, I know. I had some pet rabbits during my childhood. They didn't eat carrots when I gave them. They used to eat leafy stem part only but never the red roots.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnMoser1

This should say "carrot greens" or something instead. People get baby bunnies and feed them carrot roots, and the rabbits die.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LadyLiadin

My house rabbits are not all that fond of carrots...bananas on the other hand... Both should be given sparingly as treats.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/susanstory
susanstory
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I read on a website somewhere that, if you want to trap a wild rabbit, that, contrary to a popular cartoon character, apples are better to use for bait than carrots.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JakeH1
JakeH1
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I will never memorize the word for rabbits :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YariMsika
YariMsika
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Think of the Spanish word "conejo".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smalde
Smalde
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and catalan conill

Latin cunicŭlus

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Patrick106262

Fun English fact; the old name for rabbit used to be "coney", which is etymologically in line with the Esperanto word and all manor of European names for that animal. It's also wear the American "Coney Island" came from. The name fell out of favour (and was replaced by "rabbit") at about the same time a certain c-word explitive started to become popular, as "coney" started to be used as a slang synonym for it. Blushing conservative speakers in polite company started using "rabbit" instead, which used to be a diminutive used for young rabbits (a bit like "bunny" today).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Skribu, sur via muro, grandan bildon de Kuniklo, kaj skribu sube tiu la vorton Kuniklo kelkfoje.

Ankaŭ, mia patrino ofte diris: "Never say never, and never say always."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PyroLagus

Just think of the German "Karnickel," which means rabbit.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheDidact
TheDidact
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Never heard a German say that, are you German yourself or...?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Siavel

I can't speak for @CodeHero; however, Wiktionary indicates that "karnickel" is a German word for "rabbit". Additionally, Glosbe includes "karnickel" in its list of possible translations for "rabbit".

Sources:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Karnickel
https://glosbe.com/en/de/rabbit

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dirosissaias

what I cannot memorize is than kuniclo is the rabbit and not the bunny as in so many other languages

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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I don't know about other languages, but in English Bunny rabbit is a valid concept. So kuniKlo can mean both.

If Duo doesn't accept bunny then report it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvgenyKZ1
EvgenyKZ1
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there is also a "leporon", which can also lead to confusion

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dirosissaias

Really, but they are two different animals, they are like dog and wolf, the one is more savage than the other. P.S. another thing that I find difficult to learn in Esperanto is the use of k, instead, of c.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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From Wiki: Terminology

Male rabbits are called bucks; females are called does. An older term for an adult rabbit is coney, while rabbit once referred only to the young animals.[3] Another term for a young rabbit is bunny, though this term is often applied informally (especially by children) to rabbits generally, especially domestic ones. More recently, the term kit or kitten has been used to refer to a young rabbit. A young hare is called a leveret; this term is sometimes informally applied to a young rabbit as well.

As for the K problem, that can only come with practice. But really, having just one letter for that hard vocal click is easier than having one and three fourths. Ekzercu vin, ĝi ekos.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dirosissaias

dankon!! I know it normally should have been easier but I just can get used to it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hendrik229542

we live in the Netherlands so yeah.. Konijnen!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/americanu197
americanu197
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actually rabbits really really love just plain old grass... they dont care much for carrots basically eating carrots just to stagger the growth of their rodent teeth

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rippler
Rippler
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Technically they're not rodents, they are categorized as lycanthrop--oops, I mean lagomorpha.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Nia kuniklo tre ŝatas foliojn kaj herbojn. Ĝi ankaŭ tre ŝatas arikidaĵon.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vincemat
vincemat
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/234747137

p l i f o r t i g i - s t e r e o t i p o j

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goodnait
goodnait
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I read "A rabbits...." and it is not correct, Correct is " Rabbits.....[like carrots]" Why not " A "?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Because, in English, the indefinite article is normally only applied to singular words. a rabbit (sing) vs rabbits (plur).

This is confusing to kids growing up with the language too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sxarp
Sxarp
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I still don't understand where to use -jn and where -j

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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The ~j at the end of a word is saying that the word is plural. I suspect that you understand that already. As well I believe that you already know that the ~n is used when the word is taking the form of the direct object. So, the ~jn is used when the word is both plural and accusative.

Your problem may be because you don't understand how to define the accusative. Not to worry, this one seems counter-intuitive, until it isn't. In this sample sentence carrots is the accusative, which, in English, remains unmarked. I don't know which is your native language (you are studying English too, so…) but I'm willing to assume that your home language is also not grammar marked as Esperanto is.

I recommend going back and re-reading the notes on the topic (if your platform allows them) and/or checking out the wiki page. Or getting another good source on Esperanto grammar and studying that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredCapp
FredCapp
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Ĉu dek lingotoj? Mia respondo ne indas tiom.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sxarp
Sxarp
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Ĝi valoras pli

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sxarp
Sxarp
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Thanks a lot

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andrealphus
Andrealphus
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Is there a specific food word for rabbits? Like, is it different from the word for the animal?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KennyImam
KennyImam
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Do you mean rabbit meat? I think it would be kuniklajxo

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KennyImam
KennyImam
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Kaj mi sxatas kuniklajxon, cxar kuniklajxo estas bongusta.

8 months ago