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  5. "The men have salt."

"The men have salt."

Translation:Die Männer haben Salz.

December 27, 2012

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manuarzt

I don't really agree.....Menschen is people, humans at least, while Männer should be translated " Men" only!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChloeSETO2

But it IS translated as men


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alfonso.peixoto

I presume that the suggested answer from Duolingo was different when they posted that comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomeksip

This is bad for sure, this step should be fixed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luismerino

In nominative case, use "Die" for undefined nouns like "Männer"

Well, I'm sure there's a reason, but I wouldn't understand Männer as undefined, since it isn't "people", but "men", meaning masculine. Is this a rule to apply for other cases?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sr_encendedor

In German you use "die" for masculine and feminine plurals... der Mann > die Männer / die Frau > die Frauen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheSkargoplex

Thank you. That makes sense. Well... no it doesn't, but it's German, so whatever.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pikachu025

Lol, if you think German is illogical from the perspective of being an English speaker, I don't know what you'd think of French! ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chlax7

I think by 'undefined' it means an undefined amount of men


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/polomare

I think it must be kind of like in English when you walk into a room and say "Hi, guys" and there are girls in the room too. "Guys" may be originally masculine, but today it can be taken to just mean "people".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sloppysmusic

I've actually addressed groups of girls as guys many times. Mainly because calling them girls always sounds a little condescending. Only had one complaint too!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FindlayRei

Why does he have salt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaksimumMattis

For their Popcorn idk


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cameron1234

Menschen is people? Why is that the same as "The men have salt".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alfasprint

yes Mensch is people, but my original is "the men have" so asking for both answers is false, men is Männer and not Mensch


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zefocker

I marked Die Mánner (which was the third row) and duolingo says: "not correct. Correct is the following two"...and yes, the totally same sentence is a correction. So I think there is a bug here in the application...i read it 3 times, and totally the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimSherwin

If you entered "Mánner" like in your comment, the issue was likely your accent mark. An umlaut is two dots: Männer,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hmorri83

Wouldn't Mensch be man in the same way that man used to be commonly used to refer to the entire species?(man/mankind/humanity) That wouldn't make sense with the English translation here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lethor

I am not sure about the actual German term here, but in a previous problem I have translated Menschen men and it took a life from me. Because of that I have NOT chosen Menschen as a translation for men here and it took a life again. The consistency really needs to be checked here. (also I think Menschen should mean human, people, humanity, so I agree with the program correcting me previously, it should not be just men)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikelucas

Couldn't agree more, Menschen presumably includes females, Manner ( sorry no umlats), exclusively men.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CptDakrapa

men != humans/people etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elkalbouz

Why we don't put (einen) before (salz) >>>


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndroClift

I think it's because salt is plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MTAliz

It's neuter not plural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicahDoo

Is "Salz haben die Männer" correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Desert-R0se

No, "Salz haben die Männer" means "Salt has the men". "Die Männer haben Salz" is the correct tranlation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimSherwin

Technically, yes. The verb (haben) is conjugated to show the plural subject (men/Männer), and the verb is properly in second position. So it's grammatically correct. German allows the word order to be switched up a bit. But unless you are really emphasizing that the men have SALT, it sounds pretty odd.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonyLopez823397

Im so lost using die der das


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fatima925690

I wrire correct but it doesnt accept


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/not-rachel444

Could it also be written "Die Männer Salz haben" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimSherwin

No. The general rule is that the verb must be in second position. In your example, it is third.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveBaile503602

Why is it Die Männer if Die feminine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimSherwin

Die is feminine, but also plural. This sentence has plural "men," not singular "man." So you need to use the plural definite article, die.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sloppysmusic

Ok clarification here... Do we need to capitalize EVERY single noun wherever it is in the sentence? Swear I saw the same thing in Spanish lessons too. My spell checker is a causing havoc with this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KimSherwin

Yes. German capitalizes pretty much every noun.

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