"Ella mira hacia la ventana."

Translation:She looks to the window.

5 years ago

123 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/yagiuda

who says that: "she looks TO the window"? As far as I know you can look at or through the window.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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You can look toward a window.

"Is anything wrong?" I ask. "No." She looks toward the window.

or

She can look in the direction of the window.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

Excatly. Here window could be substituted by "at the horse" and it would all work fine. She is looking at it, not through it, in this sentence

In Spanish, the English "she looks through the window" would be Ella mira por la ventana

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JRTheJAM
JRTheJAM
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Still weird...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

"Hacia" is better translated as "toward." See this. http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/hacia

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CrackedMirror

But why would you want to say that?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJHPlus
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In this case, because we're learning a language, and seeing words in unusual contexts helps us learn them better.

Otherwise -- because she thought her route out the window might be blocked. Because something happened by the window, and she's thinking of it. Because something fell off the window sill. Because there's a mouse there. Your turn.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordin87

In prose and colloquial English we often see he/she "looks to" him/her or something similar.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smurinson

It would be " She looks up to him" , or 1. Pay attention to, take care of, as in You'd best look to your own affairs. [c. 1300] 2. Anticipate or expect, as in We look to hear from her soon. [c. 1600] 3. look to be. Seem to be, promise to be, as in This looks to be a very difficult assignment. [Mid-1700s]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordin87

No, you are incorrect. "She looks to him" is commensurate with "she looks at him." She looks "up to him" has an inherently distinct meaning from "she looks to him." (I'm a native English speaker.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phasmida

As a fellow native English speaker, I think there is a bit of a difference between the two. "She looks to him" carries the implication that she has some expectation of him. For example, "she looks to him for advice", whereas, "she looks at him" is much more passive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elabogado

This is because the appropriate word is "towards" as "in the direction of." When the word "to" is used it is when the object is not necessarily there, e.g. she looks towards him. He is in the room. She looks to him for advice - he does not have to be in the room.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CJ.Dennis
CJ.Dennis
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You're the first one here to get it right. "She looks to him" requires an indirect object, e.g. "for advice", whereas "She looks towards him doesn't.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

To CJ.Dennis, above.

"Look" is this sentence is intransitive. Being intransitive means that, by definition, it has no objects, be they "direct" or "indirect."

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

She looks to him for an explanation. Not She looks at him for an explanation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sendero

If you're a native English speak, as I am, you should know that the statement is incorrect. I am in my 76th year and have never heard that statement before now.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mstahr11

you're wrong. here's an example: http://bit.ly/1ynTx1D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smurinson

I just didn't make myself clear - Oof course look up to smb. has a different meaning , I mentioned this phrasal verb because in it we have to in combination with look. No dictionary gives look to as a synonym of look at, though. Perhaps it is a new colloquial expression - an expression borrowed from Spanish which is so widely used in USA.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordin87

You're correct: I misunderstood you. While you're right about the dictionary not listing "look to" as a synonym, the meaning is listed at the links below (in case other learners want a simple explanation). As you said, the meaning is variable.

  1. look to, a. to direct one's glance or gaze to

http://dictionary.infoplease.com/look

  1. look to, to pay attention to. to direct one's expectations or hopes to; depend on. to expect or anticipate.

http://www.definitions.net/definition/look

I've personally mostly seen this construction employed in amateur writing circles. "Look at" is a better choice.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smurinson

Hi Jordin, Thanks for he links - but I must note that in the expression "look to your right/left" the "look to" is not an independent element. so....:)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordin87

No, it isn't an independent element, and neither is the term being debated on this page--or perhaps I'm misunderstanding you again. Furthermore, in spoken English, "look to the left/right" is a very common construct also. If it's easier to understand when you substitute the word "toward," then think of it in that respect.

Take another look at the definition previously provided: look to, a. to direct one's glance or gaze to

That definition concerns precisely the point that has been debated here regarding the English translation. As I said before, I never said it (i.e., "[s]he looks to the window") was grammatically correct, but I'm simply trying to demonstrate the intent behind its usage. Regarding Duolingo's choice, it is a bit odd, but any native English speaker should be able to glean its meaning.

Furthermore, on that very page you cited is the sentence "look to the outside," [i.e., outdoors/outside of a window] which is grammatically similar to the construct on this page about which everyone is complaining or becoming confused. In another example, here is a quote from a novel:

She looks to him and says “This is the guy I told you about..."

(If you run a book search for that phrase ["she looks to him and says"], you'll get many hits. Again, I am NOT using a search to validate the grammatical construct. If someone sees it, however, they should know what it means. In all of the aforementioned sentences, "look to" or "looks to" take on a similar meaning.

I'm not a linguist, but learning colloquial speech is still important for the sake of understanding common usages, incorrect or otherwise.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1

I think I've also heard people say, "She looks to him for help or guidance" but you hardly ever hear that anymore.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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"looks towards the window"(what I used) as a sentence fragment has 240,000 google results, "looks through the window" 911,000 , "looks to the window" 58,100,000 , "looks at the window" 180,000,000 I do not see "at" listed" as a possible translation of "hacia" but I'm not so sure just how different "towards" is from "at". Clearly "towards" and "to" must be the same. Google translate uses "por" to mean both "at" and "through"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hema90

Look at the window = you look at the window, plain and simple, trying to see the window. Look towards the window = you look in the direction of the window, but may be seeing things around, in front or through the window as well. Look to the window = you look at the window, but it implies you expect to see something there, an answer, something you want/need to know

They're all slightly different, but at times can be used interchangeably. The big question is, in which cases can we use hacia? :D

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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To look at the window = "Mirar la ventana". In this case, "to look at" and "mirar" are transitive verbs. In "Mirar a la ventana", "mirar" is an intransitive verb so this is not a good translation. In addition, it sounds bad where I live (Chile) but it is accepted by the RAE (http://lema.rae.es/dpd/?key=mirar)

"Mirar hacia la ventana" means to look in the direction of the window, to see things around or in front of the window (not through it).

I am a native Spanish speaker.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArwenEastman

So since mirar means "to look at", and hacia means "to" or "toward", is there a better verb to use?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/srocknowski

I hope you don't use Google for the answers to all of your questions. One day you're going to self-diagnosis yourself with an incurable disease.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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"She looks to the window" seems to be common English and the Spanish can mean that or "She looks towards the window". If "hacia" was not used in the Spanish sentence "she looks at the window" would be the translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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It's colloquial English. Not proper English. Just because people use it doesn't make it correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michisjourdi
michisjourdi
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That's why I mentioned that it was colloquial.

She looks to him for comfort. is quite a bit different.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jordin87

While it's not proper English, it IS commonly used, so it's imperative that the meaning is understood. I can see some people here really can't discern that fact. Additionally, in some contexts, such as "she looks to him for comfort," that construct would be grammatically appropriate.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

If people using it doesn't make a usage correct, then what does?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

you don't really hope that

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OthmanAsce

I tried to replicate your results but failed. "Look to the window" = 818,000 results, "looks to the window" = 757,000 results "Looked to the window" = 1,310,000

"Look at the window" = 7,740,000 "Looks at the window" = 648,000 "Looked at the window" = 2,560,000

I think you forgot to add the quotes in your Google search. Failing to add them would result in Google searching for any instinct where at least one of the words in the sentence appears rather than the sentence as a whole, which exolaims your inflated numbers.

Now, away from the data analysis stuff, let's take a look at what Longman has to say.

  1. Look to somebody/something: A. to depend on someone to provide help, advice etc i. Look to somebody/something for e.g. "We look to you for support." ii. Lool to somebodh to do something e.g. "They're looking to the new manager to make the company profitable."

B. to oay attention to something, especially in order to improve it: i. "We must look to our defences."

I hope that helps everyone who's having trouble matching a case for the sentence. However, I'm nkt claiming that the Spanish sentence could mean any of that.

Cheers everyone.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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I like to look sentence fragments up on google's book search now. To get an idea if one thing is more used/correct. That limits the search to mostly formal writing. https://books.google.com/ngrams

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

She heard a noise in the middle of the night. Was someone breaking into her house? She looked to the window. It was closed. . .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1

Sorry ....she looked AT the window.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pheonixstrike

Yup. ★♥★♥★♥<|>★♥★♥★

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zabalaan

Exactly. Even worse than "the spider eats rice" or "the rabbit walks on my shirt". El mono habla con el comandante.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MugundhanG1
MugundhanG1
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Yes youre right

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/charley_s2
charley_s2
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Yes! That's what I thought!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schadiest1

If a correct translation is "She looks to the window" couldn't we say "Ella mira a la ventana" ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alphaa

Yes, that would be correct.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/demsw

Could ve be used in place of mira?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RebeccaRoffino

No, ve means see. Mira means look.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustKirill

ventana is not a person/pet

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mcdx3
mcdx3
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yes but in this case it means "to" just as hacia does. You use 'a' in lots of ways besides just a person/pet, but you ALWAYS use it with a person pet.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cquark
cquark
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I'm wondering when/how this is used in Spanish? In English, we can"look to" something for help or leadership -- She looks to him for advice; she looks to her teacher for help. I'm not sure why we would look to a window in that situation. I suppose we could also say, "She looks to the window, unable to look at the filthy kitchen anymore," but I would say "She looks at the window," not "to." (I'm a native English speaker.)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quetzal11

If you drop "hacia" from the sentence, would it be sufficient to translate to "She looks at the window"? How does hacer modify mirar in this case?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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"Hacia" is "towards", it has nothing to do with the verb "hacer".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cbinns27

Thank heavens someone finally explained this! All this splitting hairs over whether it is ok to say "look to the window" in English (it is, of course, though slightly old-fashioned in tone) seems utterly irrelevant.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laura_mansfield2

Thank you olio -this clarifies it for me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clemsnman

This is awkward. I put looks through the window thinking it was a spanish way of saying that. Looking to the window seems misleading.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ashi97

Is "She looks through the window" should be accepted?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olimo
olimo
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No, that is "por la ventana".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pheonixstrike

That is a pretty icon❤

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

This is a strange construction in English, especially this early in the lessons. And I don't remember seeing a translation of "hacia" in these lessons yet.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusieY

'Hacia' was introduced in the Prepositions section.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smurinson

In any case the English sentence doesn't sound right, does it?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PitchPine1

so what? we already know english

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaviOnline

El gato camina hacia el león. Rings a bell? :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Swimout64

looks at the window, or through the window i get.......looks to the window i don't get

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quiri-quiri

I am a native speaker of Canadian English -- and a writer -- and "she looks to the window" is a strange thing to say without specific context. "Looks to" could mean "takes care of" in the sense of closing and boarding up the window before a storm hits, or "looks at in expectation". But I wouldn't use it in the sense of "looks at".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kasperbow

Bad english sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WandaJNevills

We never say this in English. We say look "out" or "through" the window, not look "to" the window.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chrisk-az

I'll grant is valid English it Spanish, but it's an unusual construction (one usually looks THROUGH a window) but it also sprang "hacia" which needs reinforcing, but hasn't appeared in some time. Then again, I think I know the word better now. Objective served, but at the expense of game points.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickBulka

I have never heard anyone use the term "look to the window". It's just not something we say in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/somelauw
somelauw
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What does "look to" even mean? If both "look at" and "look through" are marked wrong, I don't even know what this sentence means in English??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/donrua1

Trick question. Would not pass question validity testing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/randnash

She looks toward the window. Accepted!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hanboning
hanboning
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hacia < facies (Latin for face), related to "facing".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Estaciabrewer

I absolutely could not hear the word hacia in that sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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I can hear it but the first "a" is very weak (I am a native Spanish speaker).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarleneLal

The translation of hacia is towards. I will just go with the Spanish and don't bother too much with the English translations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krystlew

Most Americans would say. "She looks out the window"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaunchSolu

Im curious about why hacia was used instead of "a la"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alvinmlacs

Should be "towards the window"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyPannone

That doesn't seem to be proper english

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Squiddly-Diddly

Another 'daft un'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sadistikbsbd

Can't you just drop hacia?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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No. It changes the meaning of the phrase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack.george

she looks around the window seems to fit as well and is listed as one of the many meanings for hacia. this is a crap shoot with some of these phrases and it gets so i hate to put anything down for fear of the RED letters coming up to make my day.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iCRICKET

Why doesn't "she looks out the window" work?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelpine
adelpine
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"To look out" means "to look to the outside" (http://dictionary.infoplease.com/look) so she is indoor. In the Spanish sentence, she looks in the direction of the window. She can be indoor or outdoor. ( I am a native speaker of Spanish).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobdebreet

This is not a english sentence

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M.Nacht
M.Nacht
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In school we learned mirar as to watch. So does it also mean to look?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

to look at (mirar algo / a alguien)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maturebiker

No option for to or towards given in the tablet version so impossible to get right!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dee811953

I don't understand the use of "hacia" here. Why is "Ella mira a la ventana.", not correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arman2731

What does look "to" the window mean ?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mjcm94

Is the use of Hacia needed in this sentence? It says that Mira can be "look to"... so as far as Im aware "she looks to the window makes just as much sense I would have thought.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

"Ella mira la ventana" creo que sería parecido a: She "looks at"( mirar a) window, o :"Ella mira el cuadro'¡ Ojo! Con este verbo, si fuera una persona a la que mira, dirías: Ella mira A Juan. En cambio con "Hacia"( Denota el sentido de un movimiento, una tendencia o una actitud. http://dle.rae.es/?id=JxHUqK9) Es decir, con o sin hacia; ella esta mirando, observa el cuadro o la ventana.Con hacia dirige la mirada a un sitio concreto.( los gramáticos lo describen como locativo direccional) Fíjate que Mirar al igual que sucede en inglés puede tener diferentes significados o interpretaciones dependiendo del contexto de la oración y de las preposiciones que acompañan a este verbo.

Source: wordreference.com

(...)1.look out vi phrasal (observe from indoors) mirar hacia afuera loc verb     mirar desde adentro hacia afuera loc verb   If you look out from the window, you can see the ocean.   Si miras hacia afuera, puedes ver el océano

2.look vi (cast eyes in a direction) mirar⇒ vtr   He looked to his right.   Miró a su derecha.

3.look through [sth] vtr phrasal insep (observe via: [sth] transparent) mirar por loc verb     ver a través de loc verb   You can see the individual cells if you look through the microscope. Look through the window and tell me what you see.   Puedes ver las células individuales si miras por el microscopio

4.mirar vtr (revisar)  (review, examine) look at, look through vi + prep   Quiero que mires las facturas y me digas si están bien.   I want you to look at (or: look through) the bills and tell me if they're correct.(...)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenisLagar

Yes it should be through the window

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CristianJMejia

who the @@$&^&#@ made this #($&#. Looking to the window may be correct but in all my years of living have i never heard someone say "She looks to the window." #$(@)(@#*()$&

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BlakeBlack5

Can someone explain hacia

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KatieLeeke1

She looks towards the window... matches up and makes sense! ; )

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Emet144

Why is hacia necessary in this sentence?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DPhillips222

It makes no sense to say" She looks to the window."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scarolan108

Yea, nobody says this in English. You either say "She looks through the window" or "She looks at the window".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wrlinton

I've never heard this ever.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/enoj23

It should be She looks towards the window

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rockyc138

Look to your guns, in any old war or western movie or book

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaRoyJorde

Why hacia? Why not "Ella mia a la ventana."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WilliamGeo213839

Im confused. Isnt hacer to do? Not towards?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mgurly

Can someone please explain hacia to me, I still don't get how it fits.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drmorts

And it does her no good ! !! why not she looks out of the window , or looks in through the window.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pheonixstrike

8;{#nonsense★♥★♥★♥★♥

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexis585810

and finds a creepy stalker O.O

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alexander684467

To the window? At or through...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DPhillips222

No one( at least where I'm from) says she looks to the window. You can look toward a window, through the window, at the window, in the direction of the window etc.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JH959
JH959
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That's a bad english translation. You look "at" the window, "through" the window or "towards" the window; I don't think looking "to" the window is proper English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SallyBuxma

Am i missing something?? I have never done the lessin before and it is expecting me to already know these words??

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
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This is NOT English. "Looks at" would be correct AND natural; "looks toward" would be grammatically correct but highly unnatural. In any case, in the real world (there IS a real world out there!) who looks "at" windows? Windows are for looking through, not at. Choose a different noun to look at, Duo old boy!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IraAllen

The door is locked, so she looks to the window.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NekoChan808765

Why not ella mira al ventana?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/triviakitty
triviakitty
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to the wall

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScratchSlash

She makes her saying escape

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WandaJNevills

No one looks "to" the window. We look "out" the window, or "through" the window. We don't really look "to" anything (except like "I look to my teacher for advice" which is not literally "looking" with our eyes) we look "at" things.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nattrinhmk
Nattrinhmk
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That's an awkward sentence.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ColinTyne

Some of the clues are always marked wrong, so why do they put them in, are they wanting you to fail??

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nizarazou

Hacia.....looking through!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fantalimon

i wrote she looks out the window. is this not a more appropriate translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyJacobs1

Who in the history of the English language has ever said she looks TO the window? This app is cretinous.

3 years ago
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