Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Ella busca a su hermano."

Translation:She looks for her brother.

4 years ago

151 Comments


[deactivated user]

    I believe "She is looking for her brother" is not only correct, but more colloquial than "She searches for her brother."

    EditDelete4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/peteranker

    I agree - I was told buscar = look for, search for. In English both are correct.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/O.cxnt

    'Looks for' is correct, as in, "She looks for her brother." It is the 'is looking for' that makes it incorrect. I wish I could better explain the intricacies to help you understand why, but I don't think I am qualified. Basically, it comes down to progressive tense: in the same way that you form these words in English by adding 'ing' to the end of them, you do in Spanish by adding 'ando' or 'endo' to the end of a word that is preceded by a form of 'estar.'

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    That is absolutely incorrect. While there is a present progressive tense in Spanish, it is used much less often than the progressive tenses are in English, and the simple present tense in Spanish is frequently best translated into English using the present progressive.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MarLoGS

    I have no idea what you just said but it was so eloquently written/stated lmao

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

    How is what O.cxnt said incorrect? They are just explaining that duo is looking for simple present here, not the progressive.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_W
    Paul_W
    • 18
    • 14
    • 2

    Because "She is looking for her brother" is absolutely fine. The continuous form is often marked correct on Duo, but there are times when it isn't. It's simply a gap in the programming and each time it gets pointed out to them, they will usually endeavour to put it right.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Because the present progressive/continuous is a perfectly correct translation for the Spanish simple present, and O.cxnt claims it is not. The problem here was simply that Duolingo does not always have every possible correct translation in its database (though as people report them, they get added).

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/O.cxnt

    *So, because this was not presented in a progressive tense, it is simply 'looks for,' rather than 'is looking for.' Another in a string of 'rules' of the language that I feel DL could have introduced everyone to much sooner. It is difficult to truly learn a language without understanding how it functions, and how it functions differently from your own. And, it is especially difficult to learn without being shown why something is considered incorrect, so that we may better comprehend moving forward.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

    Rather than relying on DL to provide the explanations, one can easily find the needed information on the web. There are lots of sites about Spanish out there.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_W
    Paul_W
    • 18
    • 14
    • 2

    You're tripping over yourself needlessly. 'Progressive/continuous' isn't a tense.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Except that you are still completely wrong, because the present progressive (in English) is a 100% valid translation of the Spanish simple present. The issue was one of the Duolingo database of correct translations being incomplete, and your pontificating incorrectly about how languages work is just muddying the issue.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisW930633

    Actually, no. DL is only looking for direct translations. This is arguably not an error, but rather DL trying to help 2nd language learners of Spanish to get a better intuitive "feel" for the nuances of the target language. While the present progressive is the correct translation, the point is to learn how Spanish works rather than how to become excellent translators of Spanish to English.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Peter56
    Peter56
    • 14
    • 12
    • 11
    • 10

    I quite agree I had the same translation. But Duo lingo probably sees this as "clutter"

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
    DeanG6
    • 21
    • 12
    • 9
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2
    • 2
    • 221

    "search/seek" is a more useful translation for "buscar", the further you get into studying the Spanish language. Even if you do not translate it as "search(seek)", it is good to keep "search/seek" in mind as the basic meaning for "buscar". Every other related meaning seems to branch off of "search/seek".

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/XavierWaterkeyn

    I agree.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Furbolg

    Ella está buscando a su hermano

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JRTheJAM
    JRTheJAM
    • 25
    • 15
    • 11
    • 10
    • 6
    • 2
    • 620

    Looks for is accepted and I agree, this seems like the more regularly used translation. I recommended DL that one

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/druxybriar

    Can someone tell me why there is a need for "a" here? And why couldn't we use "por" as in "Elle busca por su hermana" ?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    This is explained throughout the comments several times, so if you want more detail, look there. But briefly:

    (1) There is a need for "a" because in Spanish, when the direct object follows the verb and refers to a person (and in some cases, like with pets, an animal), you need an "a" in front of the direct object. It is just a quirk of Spanish grammar, called the "personal a" (or in Spanish, a personal), and it really doesn't have any English translation at all.

    (2) You don't use "por" because the verb "buscar" doesn't mean "to look"; it means "to look for." In English, we need a preposition, but in Spanish, it's all part of the meaning of the verb. ("Buscar" can also be translated as "to seek," as in, "She seeks her brother"--which isn't as commonly used in English as "She looks for her brother," but gives you an idea of why you don't need a preposition after "Ella busca." )

    Okay, maybe not that briefly.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zackary700465

    What is wrong with you!?!? Your name

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/zackary700465

    Shmea

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Roxie211

    I dis agree

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/majuank

    Is he lost then?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Possibly. Or maybe they're supposed to meet somewhere, and she's looking for him in a crowd.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/rlehn

    Why have "a" in there

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/GabeCoonce

    Whenever your direct object is something "personal", like a person or a pet, you use "a" before it. It's not just with buscar.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/tampanews

    But when translating into English, "brother" is not a direct object in "for her brother." So how is one to know to add the "a"?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
    Johngt44
    • 25
    • 6
    • 3
    • 62

    You have to look at the Spanish verb to decide! Buscar means "to look for" so the brother IS the direct object isn't it? It is Spanish that has the "personal a" for direct objects so it's absurd to look at the English to determine...

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    Well said.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/tampanews

    Yes, makes sense. Thanks!

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JessicaSol333700

    Thats helps so much. I was wondering the same thing. I translated too literal.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/terry.nycum

    The key is that buscar actually translates more literally to seek than search. While search takes the thing being looked for in a prepositional phrase and the place looked in as direct object, those are reversed for seek and buscar.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Astrodan
    Astrodan
    • 18
    • 10
    • 9
    • 8
    • 6
    • 3
    • 10

    As far as my internet research told me, when you busca for a person, it's busca a, with things (or verbs) it's just busca without the preposition. At least that's the rules I'll be going with now..

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/elanorigby
    elanorigby
    • 14
    • 12
    • 10
    • 10
    • 7

    If this doesn't correctly translate to "she is looking for her brother", what would?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/timistravelling

    You are correct actually (depending a bit on context). But I think Duolingo is separating out present simple and present progressive in English.

    "ella esta buscando" = she is looking for [at this exact moment] = present progressive.

    "ella busca" = she looks for/is looking for [but not necessarily walking around looking at this moment] = simple present

    "ella busca" can be used for both, but not the other way around.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/socorro.ca6

    That's right elanor

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    It does correctly translate to "She is looking for her brother," but Duolingo's database of correct translations is not always complete, as in this case.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/sieglug
    sieglug
    • 19
    • 8
    • 70

    is looking for is much more idiomatic, definitely not wrong

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/cbuntschuh

    I agree wholeheartedly the "she is looking for her brother" is correct also.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jhowey

    she seeks her brother has got to be correct

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/terry.nycum

    Report it if it says that's wrong.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/15ghines
    15ghines
    • 14
    • 8
    • 6
    • 6
    • 5
    • 4
    • 3
    • 3
    • 2

    it's technically right but it's also not how we would say it in english. like i agree that it means the same thing but looks for is a much more common translation

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/iodinea

    I know this is a basic question, but what's the rule for using "a" after a verb? Is it only after special verbs like va (go TO) and busca (search FOR)?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    No, it's not. In Spanish, there is a grammatical construction called the "personal a" that has no equivalent in English. In Spanish, if a noun direct object refers to a person [I'll expand on this bit in a minute], you put the preposition a in front of it. That a doesn't serve a real grammatical purpose in the sentence; it just signals that the direct object is a person. You don't even translate it into English. (The "for" in "search for" is part of the translation of the verb buscar: Busco mis llaves means "I am searching for my keys," for example.)

    Note: I said the direct object has to refer to a person. That's not 100% true. If you're talking about any living thing that you've ascribed a personality to or have an emotional attachment to, like a pet, Spanish speakers tend to use the a personal as well. (Busco a mi perro = "I am looking for my dog." Busco el oso = "I am looking for the bear [that is not a pet or an animal I am emotionally attached to.") My Spanish professor (who was from Spain) said that a good general rule is that if the animal has a name, you'll probably want to use the a personal.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    I realized I hadn't addressed something in your question, and that first answer was long enough I didn't want to edit. The preposition a also serves in many sentences as a normal preposition, most commonly (though not exclusively) meaning "at" or "to." With verbs like ir (voy, vas, va, vamos, van), that a is serving as a preposition. Ella va a la tienda = "She is going TO the store." Cenamos a las ocho, "We are eating dinner at eight o'clock."

    The context of the sentence is what will tell you which way a is being used.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/brahma103

    Does "su" in this sentence necessarily refer to "ella"? Can this sentence be translated "she searches for HIS (someone else's) brother"?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
    Talca
    • 25
    • 16

    Absolutamente.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    It absolutely can. In the absence of context, the most logical translation would be to assume that "su" refers to "ella," because we have no other possible person it can be, but in terms of grammatical correctness, it could be "his brother," or even "your brother" if the "you" is someone you would use usted with.

    In a real context, of course, it would be obvious which translation for su would be correct.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ginagillen
    ginagillen
    • 25
    • 23
    • 20
    • 20
    • 16
    • 5

    why is the a required here?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    In Spanish, there is a grammatical construction called the "personal a" that has no equivalent in English. In Spanish, if a noun direct object refers to a person (or, frequently, to a pet), you put the preposition a in front of it. That a doesn't serve a real grammatical purpose in the sentence; it just signals that the direct object is a person. You don't even translate it into English. (The "for" in "look for" is part of the translation of the verb buscar: Busco mis llaves means "I am looking for my keys," for example.)

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/OlegSkalsky
    OlegSkalsky
    • 25
    • 25
    • 24
    • 13
    • 9
    • 2
    • 1422

    Why "She searches for her brother" correct, but "She seeks for her brother" incorrect?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/jeffdana12

    she's looking for her brother

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

    I believe "she seeks her brother" should have been accepted

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/vrindadesh

    Isn't "buscar" in itself "to look for"? Why do you need the "a" in there?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Darkshadow117

    It's another usage of the personal a.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PetraR
    PetraR
    • 15
    • 8
    • 7
    • 3

    Why not " she seeks"? Old school but correct

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    Duolingo does not support every possible English translation in existence. What Duolingo expects its students to do is use the translations provided and learn what the Spanish words mean as a result. This is not an English lesson or some kind of Scrabble game where the objective is to come up with as many different ways to say something in English as one can think think of. All one needs to do is look at the top of the page and learn to use the supplied answer. This continuous looking for alternatives is wholly off base. Thinking up alternatives is not concerned with learning Spanish but just practicing being contrary. And this Game of Contriteness unnecessarily fills up the Comments with useless verbosity.

    Duolingo is well aware of alternate 1meanings of words. After completing this lesson you c1an get a clue as to how many alternate translations t1here are which Duo knows about but for the sake of 1simplicity does not utilize in the problems. Click on Words in the menu bar above. Then click on a word in 1the shown list. Keep clicking on different ones until you find one that shows a pop up window that shows a down arrow at its bottom. Click on that, and you will see more alternatives than you would likely guess could be possible, which Duo knows, but deliberately does not include in the problems because what Duo uses is enough to learn what the Spanish words mean.1

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    You keep using the word "contrite," but I don't think you know what it means.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    Wow! I think you are right! I always thought it meant being different for the same being different and no other reason. I guess that's just, contrary. You get a dingot, I mean a lingot.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    I think you're the expert on contrariness here. You keep suggesting that people memorize a single specific usage of a word because "that's what's at the top of the page," but in fact, learning the multiple potential translations for a word (such as that the verb "buscar" can be translated as "to look for," "to search for," or "to seek") is an important part of developing any real fluency in a language. As for commenting here rather than flagging Duolingo--there are non-native speakers of English here who are taking this course because there is no Spanish course taught in their language, and there are relatively young students here, and they may not actually be certain that those ARE also translations.

    In other words, while you may find the comments here annoying, they are where a lot of the real language learning is going on here on Duolingo, even if you think some of the questions are not worthwhile. Most of the people here are not playing a "game of contrariness"--they are genuinely trying to learn. How about you let them do that, instead of trying to shut them down?

    Here, have your lingot back. I don't actually want it from you.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    Boy, talk about contrariness! Woo!

    You need to do this. Click on Words on the menu bar above. Then click on a word in the shown long list. If the popup shows a down arrow at the bottom, click on that. If you see no down arrow, click on a different word, and keep clicking until you see a popup with a down arrow to click on. Look at several words that have down arrows at the bottom of their popups for the sake of your needed edification.

    The purpose of doing what I explained above is provide you with the understanding that Dullingo is well already aware of alternate translations and provides them, and far more than you would likely believe. And students that would like to expand their awareness of the alternatives don't need to be shedding tears in the Comments, all they need to do is follow my instructions above.

    It is clear that you are missing the point of how Duolingo is designed to work. Its aim is to make learning Spanish as simple as possible. So it puts the many possible alternatives in lists where an eager learner can learn them on their own but makes a point to not include them in the lessons for the sake of simplicity and easy learning.

    It only takes one or two English words to give an idea of what a Spanish word means, and that is what one should mainly be doing, just using those few words within the lessons. Once one has an understanding of what Spanish words mean, all those different English words become pointless because one should not then be thinking in English at all. No translation going on within one's mind whatsoever. Like for example with the color, green. One at best should not be thinking of the word, green, in one's head, but only verde when using Spanish. What is verde is verde. It is green only in English. Alternateb translations are not what we needed to be most expanding our minds about. Translations are what we ultimately need to get rid of, weeded from our minds.

    I do admit, I am a contrarian. I am contrary to not just what is annoying, but what is totally off base.

    By the way. You really saved me embarrassment. I am hard at work on a large large book and I incorrectly used the misunderstood "contrite" word several times. But thanks to you I edited that out. So I have to say, mucho gracias! I am thinking of giving you another lingot but know you would just turn it into a shiv to stick in my ribs.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/XavierWaterkeyn

    And once again, chiming in on the question of "a". "Ella busca a su hermano" - She is looking for her brother BUT "Ella busca illuminacion" - She is seeking enlightenment. And while on the subject of enlightenment, does anyone know if duolingo even bothers to read these comments and act on them?

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/THeNeeno

    No, that's what 'report a problem' is for. This is a discussion section, not a place to gripe at Duolingo. That's like complaining to the class instead of telling the teacher he didn't explain it well enough. The rest of the class may or may not agree. That doesn't really help you understand better.

    She seeks a person gets the personal 'a'. She seeks a non-person does not.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/lollykh

    'finds' is not accepted?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    No, because "buscar" does not imply that you actually find what you are looking for.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

    This is to those that like to be different. I like to be different, myself. Seriously! So the answer I provided to this problem was: "She looks for his brother." This is one of the various things the Spanish sentence says.

    When I repeat the lessons I try all the variations of what "su" and "sus" mean. Sometimes Duo slips up and does not accept the answer I provide, and in which case I report it.

    I know I need to learn all the usages of "su" and "sus" so I work at it.

    So if you want to provide an answer different than what Duo shows, do like I am doing and you can have fun reporting it when Duo slips up and dings you.

    By the way, on this occasion I did not ding out. Duo accepted, "She looks for his brother" because it is correct. So is, "She looks for your brother." And "She looks for their brother." All correct.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/galletadecolores
    galletadecolores
    • 25
    • 24
    • 11
    • 11
    • 6
    • 6
    • 2

    Ella esta buscando a su hermano would also work, right?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Marcomundo
    Marcomundo
    • 14
    • 12
    • 8
    • 8
    • 8
    • 5
    • 3
    • 3
    • 3
    • 3

    What about "she looks to her brother"... how come that's not right??

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Because the English expression "to look to" does not mean the same thing as the English expression "to look for," and therefore they don't have the same Spanish equivalent.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Marcomundo
    Marcomundo
    • 14
    • 12
    • 8
    • 8
    • 8
    • 5
    • 3
    • 3
    • 3
    • 3

    Ok then,..tell me how to say, "she looks to her brother", as in, for advice, respect & etc.?!?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/pilotlaurie

    Why is it not She looks a your brother???

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    I'm going to assume that's a typo and your suggested translation is "She looks at your brother." (If not, then the answer is, "Because that doesn't make any sense in English.")

    And it's not that because buscar doesn't ever mean "to look at." It means "to look for." The a in the sentence is not translated as "at"; it's not translated at all. It's the a personal, which is a grammatical feature of Spanish used when the direct object of a sentence is a person, and which has no translation at all in English.

    You're correct that su could be translated as "your," and while that's not the most likely translation in a context-free sentence, it's certainly one that Duo should accept. But busca can't be translated as "looks at."

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/yokidigo

    It can't be "she looks at her brother"?

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    No. "To look at" is an entirely different verb in Spanish than "to look for". "She looks at her brother" is Ella mira a su hermano.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/CARLOSDANG130097

    Duo forgot "para". DO'H !!

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/ryanmer

    "She looks" and "she's looking" mean the same thing in English.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/TobySchaff

    Not exactly. The first (simple present) is a habitual action, while the second (present progressive) means the action is occurring right now.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Yes, but they are both translated with "[ella] busca" in Spanish, unless you are trying to heavily emphasize that the action is occurring right now. Most of the time that you use the present progressive in English, you would use the simple present in Spanish.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/terry.nycum

    Colloquially, yes, but technically the simple present can mean the action is occurring now (whether it's habitual or not) in English just as it does in Spanish.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Duolingo often doesn't have a version with contractions in its "correct answers" options. (If you run into something like this again, flag it. They'll review it and probably add it.)

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Tom_Franks

    D---m the lack of idiomatic English. I wrote "She seeks her brother" which is perfectly synonymous with "searches for" and they marked it wrong.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/terry.nycum

    Report it. That's actually a more literal translation with the exact same meaning, so if anything it should be preferred.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah-Joy2

    Please do not cuss on here. Kids use this also.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Then you need to monitor your kids closely, if seeing an expurgated (and incorrectly spelled, at that, as it should have ended with an N, not an M) curse word is too much for them.

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Quinn_Miller

    I this using busca can be colloquial, We usually use it for formal settings but its not always limited to that . "buscamos un baño"

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Juanalton

    What's wrong with "She seeks her brother"? More compact than either of the given answers.

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Karenesin

    i think u can say bro instead of brother i did it before but now it says i am wrong

    4 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/gringaerin
    gringaerin
    • 18
    • 9
    • 8
    • 7
    • 6
    • 6
    • 4
    • 3
    • 2

    I got the answer right and understood when I heard it, but can anyone tell me why you wouldn't use por/para? Or is "buscar + a" the equivalent of "looks/searches for"?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JoluKatze
    JoluKatze
    • 24
    • 23
    • 21
    • 9
    • 5
    • 2
    • 14

    It is indeed, but only if what you're looking for is alive and known to you, such as a person or a pet (although not for plants, so I guess it's for things that can get lost by themselves)

    Ella busca a su perro. Ella busca a su hermano. Ella busca a Obama. Ella busca una rosa. Ella busca sus llaves. Ella busca mejorar su vida. Ella busca pareja.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Expanding on that-- it is called the "a personal" (the personal "a") and as such is used for people (known to you or not) and sometimes for animals (generally pets--animals with whom the speaker has some sort of personal connection).

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/terry.nycum

    Buscar is "search for" (or "seek"), not just "search", so you don't add (another) "for". The "a" is there due to the nature of the direct object (the thing being searched for), as described by Jose and Maggie.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/JuanBarrag6

    She search her brother -incorrect ???

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
    MaggiePye
    • 24
    • 14
    • 13
    • 3
    • 770

    Incorrect for two reasons: the correct verb form would be "searches"; and it should be "She searches FOR her brother."

    She searches for her brother = Her brother is lost and she is trying to find him.

    She searches her brother = She thinks her brother has (somewhere on his person) something he shouldn't, and she is looking for it.

    3 years ago

    [deactivated user]

      Yes. But you could say "She searches for her brother."

      EditDelete3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/arjuna725

      It sounds like she is saying 'buscar' . . .

      3 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/psychofreak

      It said that the translation is "She looks for their brother" I wonder why "her" isn't correct

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
      MaggiePye
      • 24
      • 14
      • 13
      • 3
      • 770

      "Her" has been accepted as correct for everyone who has tried it, as far as I can tell. Was it not accepted for you?

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/MarLoGS

      Why cant you use "ELLA MIRA SU HERMANO"

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
      Talca
      • 25
      • 16

      mirar = to look at y buscar = to look for (distinta en español y en inglés, también)

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Marcomundo
      Marcomundo
      • 14
      • 12
      • 8
      • 8
      • 8
      • 5
      • 3
      • 3
      • 3
      • 3

      Ok,...so how do you say, "She looks to her brother"... And why not "para su hermano"?!? ¡¡Yo estoy confundido!!

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
      MaggiePye
      • 24
      • 14
      • 13
      • 3
      • 770

      What do you mean, exactly, by "She looks to her brother"?

      It's not para su hermano because the "for" is part of the verb buscar, which can be translated as "to seek," "to search for," or "to look for."

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaShep7

      I thought the female possessive was "sus". Am i mistaken?

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
      MaggiePye
      • 24
      • 14
      • 13
      • 3
      • 770

      "Sus" is only used if the object being possessed is plural. She only has one brother, so it is su hermano.

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/kev_dude

      I hope she finds him!

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/jrayjedi

      Isn't "a" translate more frequently to "to"? Should this sentence be "She looks to her brother"? Or in Spanish "Ella busca por su hermano"? I was thinking that "por" and "para" are more often used for "for". Maybe a native speaker could help?

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
      Talca
      • 25
      • 16

      Neither por nor para are needed here. BUSCAR contains "for" within it. Por ejemplo: Lo busco. (I look for it.)

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/jrayjedi

      thx a million

      2 years ago

      https://www.duolingo.com/kimia797960

      Guys i get confused with using of a with the verbs !!!!is there anyone to help me get through this ???

      2 years ago

      [deactivated user]

        Suggest you google "'the personal a" in Spanish". Tons of good resources on this topic

        EditDelete2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/PacoPeters1

        Like English, there are many ways a phrase can be used. I'm not from the south, but "Ya'all coming to dinner" would be a way of saying "are you (people/ guys/ girls/ kids, etc.) coming to dinner?" I feel your pain kimia... It's confusing. I just posted below: "Ella busca a su hermano" If I hover over the "a" it would indicate that she was saying "She looks at her brother" but that is incorrect according to the answer provided. If that is a wrong answer than how would you say " She looks at her brother?" I've tried several translation sites and they say the same thing. I find some of the responses subjective.

        Unless you really were dead wrong in your answer it still might be correct even though you didn't get a green/ correct response.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/PacoPeters1

        "Ella busca a su hermano" If I hover over the "a" it would indicate that she was saying "She looks at her brother" but that is incorrect according to the answer provided. If that is a wrong answer than how would you say " She looks at her brother?" I've tried several translation sites and they say the same thing. I find some of the responses subjective.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

        The verb buscar means to search or look for. For looking at you would use mirar or ver.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/PacoPeters1

        Thanks. I guess I need to start looking at verbs in a more in depth way since they've been where I've been having difficulties. Thanks again.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

        You're welcome. Wordreference.com is good for figuring out which verb+preposition combinations mean what. For example, in English we say "to depend+on" but Spanish uses a different preposition to convey the same meaning: depender+de. There's lots of these guys. On the flip side, some Spanish verbs have the preps built into them (like buscar).

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/bradenz2007

        curse this

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/bradenz2007

        hi

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/bradenz2007

        I used searches instead of looks

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/wcallen
        wcallen
        • 25
        • 117

        Today, a male speaker started, well, speaking. I initially heard hermano, but listened again on slow speed and could swear he's saying the non word edemano. dl might want to do more testing of this voice,

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Tenia411

        At her brother got blame their mother, He ran away. Now she must search for her brother And fix what was wrong.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/ChuckThoma1

        Here we go again. Sounds like elimano and its Hermano, no way to progress with these constant set backs. I can't understand the male voice and i always get it wrong when he speaks ans i have to type the response. Its a waste for me. I guess i will discontinue using this program, its becoming a waste of time. Im trying to improve, not back slide and waste my time here. I understand different dialects, but if i say wood....if you hear sky, and tou type sky for your answer, and i call you wrong because the answer is wood. Does wood aound like sky, NO IT DOESNT. This is the problem with the male voice here. Thus, causing me to get answers wrong, in turn, making me waste my time, i don't have time to waste.. i wilk discontinue use of this program, please dont email me saying I'm on Fire, on a 122 day stretch...the stretch is over, blame the ridiculous male voice that says words all wrong. If that is how it is, i o longer care to learn this. Good day, it really says, " i give up sky"....according to the male voice. Inflections aside, this is ridiculous.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/josh392537

        Why not "Ella busca por su hermano." ??? I was under the impression that "a" meant "to" as in "De Enero a Diciembre." This sounds more like "She looks to her brother." like.. for advice or something. I know that Busca pertains to "searching for" or "seeking out" and look is more like Mira, but why in this case does "a" not mean "to".

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

        -The a in this case is the personal a. You can google that and see lots of examples.

        • Buscar means to look for/to search (for). Por is never used with buscar, as it is one of the verbs that has this preposition "built-in" so to speak. (I also mentioned this above, there are more verb/prep combinations like this that we have to learn).
        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/ahrass

        She searches her brother is the most correct translation.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
        MaggiePye
        • 24
        • 14
        • 13
        • 3
        • 770

        That's an incorrect translation. Buscar is most accurately translated into English as "to look for" or "to search for." The preposition needs to be included in the translation.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

        Yeah I was thinking I would use cachear a or registrar a to talk about physically searching someone.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Hhowell4694

        Like as in frisking?

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
        MaggiePye
        • 24
        • 14
        • 13
        • 3
        • 770

        Ahrass is incorrect on the translation.

        2 years ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Kevin-Buck

        its not my fault i got it wrong

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
        MaggiePye
        • 24
        • 14
        • 13
        • 3
        • 770

        If you gave the correct answer and Duolingo didn't accept it, you should have reported it. (Too late now, but in future, do report it. It's the only way they know to fix problems.) If you gave an incorrect answer, whose fault was it?

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Kevin-Buck

        i gave correct answer, is okay.

        5 months ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/ChloeShammer

        I was right, look for and search are the same thing

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
        MaggiePye
        • 24
        • 14
        • 13
        • 3
        • 770

        "Look for" and "search for" are the same thing in English.

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/WmEsq77

        She looks at your

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Prakhar786

        Busca means "to search for" or "to look for". To find something by vision is the sense. "A" is for personal object here.

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Elasel1

        Why should I put 'for'?

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
        MaggiePye
        • 24
        • 14
        • 13
        • 3
        • 770

        Because the verb buscar means "to search for" or "to look for."

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/ronaldgarb1

        How do you say she searches for her brother versus she searches for your brother since us could mean your or her? Also wondering why this was "sus" for her brother and not su?

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
        MaggiePye
        • 24
        • 14
        • 13
        • 3
        • 770

        It's not "sus"; it's "su." And in general, you would have context to know whose brother she was searching for: her [own] brother; her [another woman's] brother; his brother; or your brother.

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/purlines

        .

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/druxybriar

        Can someone tell me why there is a need for "a" here? Why couldn't we put "por" ?

        1 year ago

        https://www.duolingo.com/Squeak_3

        Why isn't "She looks at her brother." correct? The "a" in the sentence means at doesn't it?

        1 year ago

        [deactivated user]

          See MaggiePye's explanation below. Buscar means to look for, to search or to seek. Mirarar means to look at. Quick explanation of the personal a: http://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/persa

          EditDelete1 year ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
          MaggiePye
          • 24
          • 14
          • 13
          • 3
          • 770

          No. The a in the sentence is not actually translated into English; it's a grammatical feature called the "personal a" that is used when the direct object both follows the verb and refers to a person (and sometimes animals, like pets).

          The verb buscar does not mean "to look at" or even "to look"; it specifically means to look for.

          If you want to say "She looks at her brother, " you have to use the verb mirar, which means "to look at": Ella mira a su hermano. (There's that personal a again. It doesn't mean "at"--that's part of the meaning of the verb; it signals that there's a direct object that refers to a person.)

          1 year ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/zackary700465

          _(--)/

          1 year ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/Joe313608

          So why is the 'a' in there? Doesn't that mean 'to'?

          1 year ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/MaggiePye
          MaggiePye
          • 24
          • 14
          • 13
          • 3
          • 770

          Read the rest of the discussion. This has been answered at length.

          1 year ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/kimcy05

          What happened to "she's looking for her brother"... Isn't there a translation for that?... Who uses "she searching for her brother ", Duo please teach us conventional Spanish. Tnx

          11 months ago

          https://www.duolingo.com/googoogajoob

          Can it not be she looks to her brother? ie. She looks to her brother for help

          9 months ago

          [deactivated user]

            No, the verb buscar means to look for, or to seek. (The "a" does not mean "to" in this context, it is simply "the personal a". )

            EditDelete9 months ago