Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Han grer håret."

Translation:He brushes his hair.

3 years ago

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Detti654654
Detti654654
  • 24
  • 23
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 2
  • 426

How does one know if it's his hair or someone else's?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8

It's implied that it's his own when no other possessive is present.

However, it would still be correct to write "Han grer håret sitt".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RikSha
RikSha
  • 18
  • 18
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9

Is this verb more often used than 'kjemme' or is there a difference between the two?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TCAC2
TCAC2
  • 20
  • 9
  • 7

They mean the same thing, and they are both quite commonly used. Which of the words you use mostly depends on where in the country you're from.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8

Technically, "å kjemme/kamme" refers to combing with a comb, while "å børste" refers to brushing with a brush. In the case of "å børste", the distinction is quite poorly observed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gzeebzee
Gzeebzee
  • 21
  • 19
  • 19
  • 14
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8
  • 7
  • 2
  • 4

Is 'å gre' in anyway like English groom? 'Han grer hesten sin'. ...?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deliciae
Deliciae
Mod
  • 25
  • 24
  • 18
  • 16
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 8

Only as long as the grooming is being done with a brush.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arkhaeaeon
Arkhaeaeon
  • 15
  • 12
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2
  • 2

https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/Reconstruction:Proto-Germanic/garaidijaną

It's from Old Norse 'greiða'. An English cognate would be something like 'arede' (the a- prefix replaces the ge- which became y- in Middle English), from 'rede' (to give council/advice, set order).

The 'setting in order' meaning had the connotation of brushing hair even in Old Norse.

The verb 'to groom' comes from the noun, which meant 'attendant'. It is a variation of 'goom' from Old English 'guma' (man), cognate with Latin 'homo/hominis' (human).

1 year ago