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  5. "Mi povas fari kafon."

"Mi povas fari kafon."

Translation:I can make coffee.

June 12, 2015

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/397280004

What is the exact meaning of this, does it mean "I am able to make coffee" or "I am allowed to make coffee" wouldn't they use eblas and rajtas respectively.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2342

Mi povas paroli Esperanton.
I can/am able to speak Esperanto.
scipovi = scii + povi (to know how to do something)

Eblas, ke pluvos morgaŭ.
It is possible that it will rain tomorrow.
eblo = possibility/potential

Vi ne rajtas kuri en la domo.
You may not run in the house.
rajti = to have the right to/to have permission to


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/397280004

So if I understand correctly.

Mi rajtas fari kafon. = I am permitted to make coffee.

Mi povas fari kafon. = I am capable of making coffee.

Could one actually use eblas here, would it perhaps mean something along the lines of "It is possible for me to make coffee" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2342

I think so, if it's in the sense of "the conditions are right that I might decide to make coffee".

http://lernu.net/cs/forumo/temo/4226


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/397280004

Thank you for your quick and clear replies.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

rajtas = allowed (as well)

Mi povas fari kafon = I can make coffee.

Mi kapablas fari kafon = I am capable of making coffee.

Eblas por mi fari kafon = It is possible for me to make coffee. (I think)

Can anyone confirm if this is right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2342

That sounds about right. Can you make out what's being said over at this link?
http://lernu.net/cs/forumo/temo/4226


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

Its a discussion thread on whether or not "povi" and "ebli" are synonyms. Basically, the consensus, from what (admittedly not a lot) I've read, is that they are similar with subtle differences, so technically they are synonyms, not interchangeable in usage but usually meaning the same thing (synonymous).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vqetu

It's a good thing, probationer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tigonus

I initially translated this as, "I can do coffee," as in the sense of, "Let's do lunch," or "I can do drinks with you this evening." Is this an acceptable translation? Or is this just English slang usage seeping in?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2342

Neither. Many languages don't distinguish between "to do" and "to make". The appropriate translation of this sentence is "I can make coffee."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ziliya

Is "fari" the general word for "to make", or is it specific for "making food" (i.e. cooking; like the russian варить)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
  • 2342

I believe it is the general "to do/to make".


[deactivated user]

    in translation is "to make/to do". OMG that English is wierd.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2342

    In many languages, "to do" and "to make" is the same word. English happens to use different words.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nvirjskly

    Directly from romance languages


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdamScott794079

    You can "do" coffee! I have been cheated


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2342

    "Doing" coffee is going out with someone socially for coffee/tea/snack.
    "Making" coffee is specifically preparing the beverage coffee.

    Even though some languages have the same word that means both "to do" and "to make", English distinguishes between them and the two phrases mean different things.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mico12345

    Not really. You could say 'I can do coffee' and have it mean make if that's what's being referred to. Although you would normally not say it since no real work is involved. You might hear someone say, I can do lasagna.

    But there are situations where you might say "I'll do the coffee."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2342

    There's a world of difference between the English "I can do coffee" (as in meet you at a coffee shop or diner tomorrow afternoon) and "I can do the coffee" (as in make a pot of coffee for the group, if you're bringing donuts and someone else is bringing veggies and dip).

    "I can do lasagna" and "I can do the lasagna" are synonymous (meaning make the food to serve to others) because there is no social activity we call "doing lasagna" the way there's a social activity we call "doing coffee".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KX3.

    How do you say "I can do coffee" (in the sense of having coffee) then?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2342

    Translation is about what the words mean, not what they literally are.

    The use of "do" in sentences like this is highly idiomatic and fairly unique to English -- as is "have" in the sense of "consume".

    Therefore, in the absence of any Esperanto idioms I'm unaware of, I would simply say, "Mi povas trinki kafon [kun vi] [al kafejo]".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RWAR300

    When I reproduce the audio I can only (and barely) hear an "I" at the beginning. That led me to confusion several times whilst writing "Li" or "Vi" because I just couldn't hear the consonant "M" at the beginning. I'm sorry, Duolingo, but please fix this...


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rae.F
    • 2342

    The best way to make suggestions like this is to report (flag) the lesson. The team isn't necessarily watching the comments here.

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