"El artista tiene buena fama."

Translation:The artist has a good reputation.

5 years ago

54 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Benjamin17
Benjamin17
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Terrible sentence

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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The sentence is fine with its primary translation: "The artist has a good reputation." "Fama"="Fame" "Buena/Mala fama"="Good/Bad reputation." The sentence only becomes terrible when DL allows the translation "The artist has (a) good fame" which makes little or no sense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

So this is saying they have a good reputation as opposed to saying they are well known?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klingo101
Klingo101
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"The artist has good reputation" is the literal translation. It may not sound good in English, but that is exactly what you are saying in Spanish. That is the tricky step with translation: finding the perfect balance between exact translation and it sounding correct.

Literal translations are often altered to appeal to the ear, but sometimes in the process the true meaning is disfigured or lost.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hughcparker
hughcparker
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"The artist has a good reputation" is the exact translation. The Spanish word can mean both "fame" and "reputation", but you have to choose the English word that matches what the Spanish sentence is saying.

As @jellonz says, "the artist has good fame" makes no sense in English, and is an incorrect translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klingo101
Klingo101
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I agree entirely about using the word reputation. My point was on adding an "a" into the English translation where none existed in the Spanish. I agree that it is a correct translation to say "The artist has A good reputation", but if you were to literally translate it word for word, it would come out as "The artist has good reputation". I am aware that this does not sound correct in English and that adding the "a" is necessary.

The point of my previous comment was simply that "The artist has good reputation" is the literal, albeit not smooth or correct sounding, translation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klingo101
Klingo101
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When I said an exact translation, what I meant to say was a literal translation (I have already edited my post and replaced the word exact with literal). In order to illustrate the point I was trying to make in my post, allow me to use a manuscript that was originally written in several old languages over two thousand years ago, the Christian Bible. There are many translations of the Bible into English (ESV, NKJV, KJV, NLT, etc.) because scholars disagree upon how the words should be translated. Some versions are closer to the original text than others. Some transpose words or phrases to clarify meaning. And some add words to the text to bring clarity to the point that is trying to be made. Then there is what is called a “literal translation”. That kind of translation does not always use complete or smooth sentences, and sometimes it uses improper English grammar. (Just like “The artist has good reputation” is not smooth, and perhaps not even proper.) The reason this translation does this is because it is taking the ancient languages and literally translating them word for word, hence the name “literal translation”. This kind of translation is used mostly by scholars and such to get the exact wording of the manuscript, nevertheless, the point I was trying to make in my post was that a literal translation does exist and it can be useful for understanding exactly what is being said in the language it is translated from. It may not be smooth (just like “The artist has good reputation” is not smooth), but the point of it is not to be smooth, but to show the exact wording of the original text.

To further build my case, I will present another example. In the bonus lesson on Spanish Idioms, there was one idiom that DL translated as the English idiom “let bygones be bygones”, yet the Spanish sentence did not contain any of those words. This is one of the reasons almost no one liked the Spanish Idioms lesson, because it did not give exact translation of what was being said in Spanish (if I remember correctly the literal translation was something like “Blot and write again”, but I cannot remember for sure). My point is that literal translation can be helpful in understanding the workings of another language. The point of learning a language is not to simple translate it, but to understand fully what is being said and grasp how it all fits together.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hughcparker
hughcparker
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Ah, ok. I see.

If I've understood you right, you mean that it's a word for word translation. "An exact translation" would imply that it's a translation of the sentence, which it isn't.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alan844763

The Spanish word can mean both "fame" and "reputation" - that explains it! Similar, though the opposite, of the English word 'infamous' which is applied to people who have a very bad reputation (usually for criminal acts etc) and who will often be well known or famous for being 'infamous'. The Spanish for infamous seems to be 'infame'.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hughcparker
hughcparker
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I'm assuming you mean the Spanish sentence. Could you explain what's wrong with it?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Benjamin17
Benjamin17
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I came across this sentence "1 year ago" but I'm assuming jellonz nailed it. I probably saw "The artist has good fame" instead of "The artist has a good reputation".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sabio_mucho
sabio_mucho
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"the artist has a good fame" would never be uttered by an English speaker. "The artist has great fame" or the "The artist is famous" would be more natural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/niger700

Sabio, I wrote "the artist is famous", but Duo said no. We all learned something. I did not look at the suggested words which was a mistake on my part.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/merrygunn2

Exactly! No English speaker goes around saying "has great fame" rather than " is famous".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaDhyan
MaDhyan
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I translated this sentence as "The artist is very famous", which, to me is an acceptable way of saying this in English, not 'The artist has good fame". However, I now see that 'fama' can be translated as 'reputation', in which case 'The artist has [a] good reputation" would be fine (with the addition of the 'a', of course. Which begs the question, as always, are we supposed to translate into good English (or whatever is the student's language) or are we just meant to translate literally, because, to my mind, the proof that a student has learned well is to be able to understand the meaning of the sentence and translate it in good form in their own language. If we were to speak a foreign language by translating our own language word for word, using the same sentence structure as our own language, it would not be acceptable, so why should it be acceptable the other way around? Surely understanding and using the different sentence structure is an integral part of learning and speaking a new language? I wish this matter could be clarified because too many times I've been marked wrong for giving an acceptable translation, retaining the meaning of the sentence, rather than giving a clumsy word-for-word translation. And now, we can't even suggest a better way of translating a sentence in the practice sessions, as DL has removed that facility!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The ability to suggest a change still exists in the Android app at least, although occasionally I have seen no My answer should have been accepted but you can nevertheless leave a comment with the flag.

But I don't think your translation is a good one. Although it is possible to say El artista tiene fama meaning The artist is famous, the expression tener buena fama in Spanish is used to say that they have a good reputation. Remember that there is the adjective famoso in Spanish which means famous. So a Spanish speaker would definitely see a difference in meaning between El artista tiene buena fama and El artista es muy famoso. In your quest to find a better translation, you can't lose track of what the Spanish sentence actually means as opposed to what it looks like it could mean. Of course you do add in the indefinite article in English because it is required. But remember tener and comprar are used without the indefinite article in Spanish when you are talking about something a person generally has only one of. Tengo casa grande. Or compré auto nuevo.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adder3
adder3
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Shouldn't that be "el artista tiene una buena reputacion". Would not it be more natural to translate DL as " the artist is very famous"? (As opposed to infamous)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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"The artist is famous" failed.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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An old fashioned but common phrase is "of good repute."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaponiD
CaponiD
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Duo corrected my "the artist is famous" with "the artist has good fame". Now I'm not 100℅ that my answer is the best, but it is definitely better than Duo's correction.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pnapthine
Pnapthine
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Yours is much better, but an even better version, to take into account the 'buena', is "the artist is very famous". Duolingo still didn't accept it. I shall report that their version is not good English. Noone says 'has good game'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I think it is better to stay away from the cognate in this case. Fama also means reputation and since we do speak of people, places and things having a good reputation that makes Buena easy. It also keeps the verb to have as a translation for tener. It is the absence of the article that makes it difficult for some, but after the verb tener the definite article is often omitted for things that one tends to have only one of.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/fama

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pnapthine
Pnapthine
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*'fame' even lol

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/spoelie

El artista? Why not la artista?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AussieFruitNinja
AussieFruitNinja
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Porque el artista es un hombre, chico, o niño. (Sólo para el foro).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/saritalin

I went with 'the artist has great fame' on 11/30/13 - but it was rejected

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markbooth
markbooth
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That sounds like a very awkward sentence to me so it seems good that it was rejected.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It has now been accepted. 1/29/16. I didn't love the sound either, but was curious. I found it interesting that you could say has great fame (however awkwardly), but could not say has great reputation without the "a". I think I have finally figured out when to use the definite article in Spanish, but realize I still don't know how to explain its use in English, although it is my native language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnycc

Great would be "gran". The Spanish sentence is awkward, but I don't think that's the right translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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Still rejected 5/8/14. Reported.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

The natural sounding English expression that you are all looking for is "the artist enjoys good fame". However, this is obviously not an accurate translation. Many of the latter have been well covered here already.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/griffindance
griffindance
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This sentence makes little sense in english.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hughcparker
hughcparker
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Maybe Duo's changed the translation. At the moment it says "The artist has a good reputation", which is a perfectly valid and natural sounding English sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mysieblondie

Although it doesn't make sense in English it could be the more natural way to say it in Spanish. If someone has a good reputation maybe they use the word "fama" more often than the word "reputación".

But I don't know this for sure, just a thought.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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What else is new. Another awkwardly phrased sentence that only a native Spanish speaker would know how correctly translate. IF you want to stop the clutter; how about replacing the translator; then posters would not have so much to complain about.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mysieblondie

I put "The artist has good fame." and it was rejected. to me this sounds more natural in English than to say "The artist has a good fame." <--this sounds unnatural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tlock835
tlock835
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Frustrating

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/41050
41050
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That is not correct english

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aterix

Is "el artista" supposed to be correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Many professions, especially those ending in ista, do not change their endings based on gender. Only the article will change. El artista is the male artist and la artista is the female artist.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charlie6361

Why is artista masculine

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Artista and other words associated with roles or professions ending in ista can be either feminine or masculine depending on the gender of the person. El artista es José. La artista es Maria. I believe that the ista suffix is foreign to Spanish (from Greek if I remember) and therefore does not change with gender. Like this one, many Spanish words ending on ista are cognates with our words ending in ist and this applies to them all.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pamken
pamken
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English would never be expressed like that

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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This sentence is actually a common one in English. If you read reviews of art exhibitions you might see this version exactly, but we speak of the good (or bad) reputation of people and businesses all the time. I drive for Uber, and my riders are always asking me about the restaurants and hotels they are going to. A common response for me might be, I haven't been there, but it has a good reputation or the chef has a good reputation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevenRost2
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I put "The artist is very famous" because that would be exactly what I would say as a native English speaker, if I wanted to express that "the artist has great fame"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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This doesn't say that the artist has great fame. It is also not what one would say in Spanish. That would be Él artista es muy famoso. The expression tener buena fama means to have a good reputation.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Fama

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StevenRost2
StevenRost2Plus
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I shouldn't have used "great". When I put in my answer of "The artist is very famous", Duo told me me the translation was "The artist has good fame". But I now see that the most accepted translation is "The artist has a good reputation". I would argue that "The artist has good fame" should not be accepted, even though that is the literal translation (and the one I used to finish the lesson), because it really makes no sense in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Duo has a rather buggy algorithm that tries to find the closest acceptable answer to whatever you answered. As to why that version is accepted, I was able to find this discussion as to when one would say great fame and when you would say excellent reputation.

http://languagelearningbase.com/406/great-fame-vs-excellent-reputation

Now I certainly agree with you that great fame is clunky English at best, but obviously has some users. Since Duo is not teaching English here, any direct translation that has usage in English should be accepted. It is programming for those answers that are perhaps better but less direct that causes most problems anyway. I would like Duo to either fix or eliminate that algorithm that tends to produce these somewhat strange answers, but I don't mind that they are accepted. There is nothing grammatically incorrect about that sentence and it does show that you understand the meaning and structure of the Spanish sentence. I might have a different reaction if this were the English course, but actually since I found that discussion of the topic in English, I might not.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian.Mckay

Awful sentence not accepted english at all

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lew86071

I agree. This is a poor english sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The preferred translation is The artist has a good reputation. That is perfectly good English and it is extremely common to say someone has a good or a bad reputation. Duo is highlighting three different points with this sentence:

1) Artista, like other -ista nouns, always maintains the a ending and changes only the ending to indicate a man or a woman.

2) La fama has a wider range of meanings than those represented by the cognate "fame"

3) Tiene does not require the indefinite article when expressing possession or ownership of something that one generally only has one of. Buscar and a couple of other verbs do the same thing. This is the only difference between the use of the indefinite article in the two languages.

Duo sometimes accepts awkward translations because it.can't really not grammatically despite their awkwardness. But if you look at the suggested translation you can sometimes see why the sentence was included.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikepedrosa

why can't my answer be considered

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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If you are asking Duo (who can retrieve your answer) you need to press the flag not the speech bubble. If you are looking for user input, you have to tell us your answer as we don't know what it was.

2 years ago
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