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"Groente en fruit"

Translation:Vegetables and fruit

0
3 years ago

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Nikolao-Bruselo

Why "vegetable and fruit" is reported as wrong while the pop-up traduction of "Groente" is either "Vegetables or vegetable"

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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In Dutch "groente" can either be the singular vegetable, or the uncountable vegetables (similar to the usage of fruit in English, and in Dutch as well). Since a noun without an article cannot be singular in a normal sentence, "groente" has to be the uncountable version here, so the plural "vegetables" has to be used in English.

"De groente en het fruit" can either mean "The vegetables and the fuit" (uncountable groente) or "The vegetable and the fruit" (singular groente).

FYI the plural form of "groente" is either "groenten" or "groentes".

33
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StefanusPa

I know that groenten means vegetables (more than one) but in this case, why groente become plural? If it can be both plural or singular, why vegetable (singular) is wrong?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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In the Dutch sentence, no article is used before groente, this means it cannot refer to a single type of vegetable, but only to vegetables in general. The uncountable form of vegetable doesn't exist in English (unlike fruit), so one has to use the plural in English, singular would refer to a single vegetable which is different from the Dutch meaning.

9
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garpike
garpike
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Is that an alveolar or a uvular trill in 'fruit', or (as it sounds to me) both at the same time?

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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There is a distinction in English between greens and vegetables. If I tell my grandson "Eat your greens, they're good for you!" I do not mean his potatoes and carrots, but his cabbage and sprouts (yuk!)

Does Dutch have this distinction?

1
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saurabh987187

Why here "groente" pronounced so different then by real people (even on google translate)?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
Mod
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I don't think the pronunciation here is very strange. Keep in mind that there is not 1 precise way of pronouncing a word, for example a different accent can make a big difference.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruere06
Bruere06
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Veg is a common abreviation for vegetables. Veg and fruit is possible, but fruit and veg is much more common. We often refer to cooked vegetables as greens

-3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Flora_Cheung

I sort of disagree with you. In midwest where I lived, we say "veggie(s)" as the short form. Never heard of using "veg"!. Also, vegetables can include cooked carrots, other root vegetables, legumes, and even cooked "fruit" like eggplant, corn and tomato etc. Cooking greens can be referred as cooked vegetables, and not vice versa, though!

2
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laypix

Completely agree. The only thing anyone would say where I live is veg. Plural and correct in terms of this sentence.

0
Reply9 months ago