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  5. "Hvorfor skynder dere dere?"

"Hvorfor skynder dere dere?"

Translation:Why are you in a hurry?

June 14, 2015

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/7bubble7

So with another pronoun would it be, for example, hvorfor skynder jeg meg?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Yes, exactly. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sullstred

Does that mean ''Jeg skynder deg'' is the correct translation for: ''Hurry up you lasy git''?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

You could say "Skynd deg!", but when including a subject it only works reflexively.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langjd

It would certainly make you a Leuteschinder.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WolfgangCorbett

Great example. The difference between subject and object in the first person makes the grammar stand out so much more than "dere dere".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CorgiAtom

Thanks Julia. That cleared it a lot for meg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SunlitMoon

Would this be 'why am I hurrying myself'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deliciae

Literally translated, yes. It's not as common to treat it as a reflexive verb in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulaerwe

So, the original question could be seen as 'why are you hurrying yourself?' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimTroup

Maybe a Scottish thing but I would see "why hurry yourselves" as acceptable too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moomingirl

I tried that too, and I'm (Southern) English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VengerR

As an American, I'd say that "why hurry yourselves" is something I would say, but that it would have a slightly different meaning to me than "why are you in a hurry." I'd say "why hurry yourselves" to mean "why bother hurrying" rather than asking why they were in a hurry. I'd see it as more of a rhetorical question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paulaerwe

Not really because that's an opinion, 'why are you in such a hurry.... when you've got lots of time?' rather than just asking someone why they are in a hurry, which is inquisitive rather than a statement of a fact.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StevenWath

Why not just "Hvorfor skynder dere?" Why is dere repeated?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrijAndrusiak

Because one dere is object and the other one is subject. That is, I hurry = Jeg skynder meg, and You (pl) hurry = Dere skynder dere


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MuttFitness

This sounds like an awkward language thing that actual user of the language would tend to avoid. Like "allow myself to introduce myself"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimKerslake

Thanks everyone on this thread, you made me smarter! :) <3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/langjd

This should be someone's trademark sentence on a show.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ghayth90

Reflexives! As beautiful as they are, they are often hard to understand


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chauchat24

Funny, we kinda have the same words repetition in French for the exact translation : "Pourquoi est-ce que vous vous dépêchez ?" though there is not much in common regarding the rest of the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/En-tyskr-i-Norge

Sounds like the German "Warum schindet ihr euch."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jar30pma23

"Dere dere" at end sounds funny????? Why not "dere skynder dere"???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NJG88

If it were a statement then that would be the correct word order, however, in this example the sentence is a question and so the verb comes before the subject.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/masih340037

"Hvorfor har dere i darlig tid?" Does it have the same meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SAM_Kh

Why are you in hurry ? Isn't it correct? How to know to place a or not ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Candidandelion

You can be 'in a hurry' or 'in a rush'.

You definitely need the 'a', but I'm afraid I don't actually know why. It's just how we say it.

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